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    #1

    Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Mr. Ram didn't agree with it and he left adjourning the meeting.

    I want to understand why can't we use adjourned above and why to use present participle?

    Thanks

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Because the present participle is needed to modify 'he'.

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    #3

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Additionally, a comma after 'left' is essential.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...-wearing-a-hat
    There were discussions about whether a comma was needed before a present participle in a similar construction, and they thought that it was not needed.
    Why is a comma essential in the sentence here? Is it because 'adjourning' means 'thus adjourning' here?
    Not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Matthew, this is a different construction. In this case, "adjourning" could have been preceded by "thus" or "thereby".

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    #6

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Can you please explain what do you mean by modify? If I use adjourned, it wouldn't modify "he".

    I just what to understand clearly whether in place of present participle, we can use past participle or not

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/modify See definition#2.
    I think you can say 'he left and adjourned the meeting', where 'adjourned' is the simple past instead of the past participle, and it is a verb instead of a modifier.

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    #8

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    If I don't want to use and then it should be adjourning only. May I say after one past participle we can't use another present participle immediately thereafter.

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    #9

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Examples please.

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    #10

    Re: Mr. Ram didn't agree

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    I just what to understand clearly whether in place of present participle, we can use past participle or not
    If you end up with a grammatical sentence that means what you intend, you can use either (in this case).
    "Mr. Ram didn't agree with it and he left, adjourning the meeting." (This could mean that his leaving automatically adjourned the meeting, or that, on leaving, he adjourned the meeting.)
    "Mr. Ram didn't agree with it and he adjourned the meeting and left." (Note that the word order needed changing, since he could not have adjourned the meeting after he'd left.)
    "Mr. Ram didn't agree with it and he adjourned the meeting by leaving." This is another possibility, if his leaving automatically adjourns the meeting.

    NO rules are meant to be taken from this.

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