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    #1

    Take Her By The Arm To

    I have a question about usage of "take". In this dictionary, definition 1 for "take" reads:

    "to move something or someone from one place to another"

    In the same entry, definition 7 for "take" reads:

    "to reach out and get something, especially with your hand"

    Then, on google, there is this sentence:

    "He then led the victim out the back door of the apartment, telling her not to tell anyone what had happened.   Finally, he took her by the arm to a nearby wooded area.   When she screamed Carter killed her. "

    The usage in the example seems to compress the two senses of "take" into a single phrase. Could it be nonstandard?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    It's a normal, common usage.
    One of the examples in your link definition 7 says "take someone by the arm/hand etc: Her mother took her gently by the shoulders."


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    #3

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    @Raymott

    Would this:

    "He grabbed her by the arm and took her into a nearby wooded area."

    be better?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    That is a completely different meaning. It implies force.

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    #5

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    @MikeNewYork

    So, this:

    "He took her by the arm into a wooded area."

    is standard English? How about this:

    "He grabbed her by the arm into a wooded area."

    ?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    The first works for me. The second doesn't.

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    #7

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    @MikeNewYork

    Would this:

    "He took her into a wooded area by the arm."


    work?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    Yes. What are you trying to get at?

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    #9

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    @MikeNewYork

    It's just that if you look at my post #1, both definition 1 and definition 7 are used by the example.

    Also, in:

    "He took her by the arm into a nearby wooded area."

    the phrase "by the arm" does not modify the noun "her". It modifies the verb "took".

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Take Her By The Arm To

    I think both 'by the arm' and 'into a nearby wooded area' modify 'took'.
    Do you mean a single verb should not be modified by two prepositional phrases?

    Not a teacher.

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