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    #1

    Outside Of

    I have a question about the usage of "through" and "outside of". Consider these sentences:


    1a. He made transactions through Amazon Payments.
    2a. He made sales through Ebay.
    3a. He made wire transfers through Bank Of America.


    According to google searches, the opposite of the above sentences is not formed by inserting "not" before "through" like these:


    1b. He made transactions not through Amazon Payments.
    2b. He made sales not through Ebay.
    3b. He made wire transfers not through Bank Of America.


    , but by replacing "through" with "outside of":


    1c. He made transactions outside of Amazon Payments.
    2c. He made sales outside of Ebay.
    3c. He made wire transfers outside of Bank Of America.


    Yet, for this context (Amazon Payments, Ebay, Bank Of America), the dictionary definition of "through" is not really a perfect opposite of the dictionary definition of "outside of". "Through" means "by using". But "outside of" does not quite mean "by not using".

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Outside Of

    Google, love it as I do, is of very little help in learning English.

    In this context "not through" and "outside of" mean the same.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Outside Of

    It's an unnatural way of trying to denote the opposite of something. The simplest way to express what you seem to want to express is by putting the verb into the negative.

    He paid through PayPal.
    He didn't pay through PayPal.

    If you really want to keep "He paid", I would say "He paid using a method other than PayPal".

    "Outside of" is similar to "with the exception of".

    Outside of PayPal, online payment methods are inherently insecure.
    With the exception of PayPal, online payment methods are inherently insecure.

    (Note that this is not my opinion of online payment methods, I'm just using it as an example.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Outside Of

    @emsr2d2

    Dictionaries do say that "outside of" means "with the exception of". But when I substitute this sense of "outside of" into sentences 1c, 2c, & 3c in post #1, I get:

    1d. He made transactions with the exception of Amazon Payments.
    2d. He made sales with the exception of Ebay.
    3d. He made wire transfers with the exception of Bank Of America.

    , which is awkward. It seems that "outside of" as used in:

    (from post #1)
    1c. He made transactions outside of Amazon Payments.
    2c. He made sales outside of Ebay.
    3c. He made wire transfers outside of Bank Of America.

    does mean "not through" or "using methods other than". This usage seems popular with banking and other online sales field. Could it be technical jargon?

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    #5

    Re: Outside Of

    No. It's standard English.

    See this thread.

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