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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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      • Taiwan
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      • Taiwan

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
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    #1

    I've drawn it out and cut it in to be.

    http://odb.org/video/emerge-anew/
    I've drawn it out and cut it in to be.

    What does the above sentence mean?
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • Australia
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      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #2

    Re: I've drawn it out and cut it in to be.

    It's a bit poetic. The surfboard didn't exist. It was a slab of wood.
    So he drew out the not-yet-existentent surfboard (the video shows this), and then he cut the surfboard out of the wood (as also shown).
    It sounds strange to me too. "I cut it in to be." means (to me), "I cut into the wood so that the surfboard that I had drawn came to be (exist)."

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