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    #1

    may be work/will have worked

    1. He may have work on Sunday.
    2. He will have worked on Sunday.

    Do both sentences have the same meaning?
    Last edited by Ajay 123; 03-May-2015 at 21:10.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: may be work/will have worked

    No. The first means that there is a possibility of there being work for him on Sunday. The second is more definite.

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