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    #1

    Two situations described in the main clause ?

    I consulted my grammar book many times, but I didn't get it what its meaning.

    I don't know how to use it with "Two situations described in the main clause"

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  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    The following are my understanding of your book, but I am not a teacher.

    The situation described in the main clause is 'have met neighbours'.
    The situation described in the time clause is 'have lived here'.
    The two situations extend until the present, so the present perfect is used in both.

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    #3

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    what about since?

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    #4

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    What's your problem with 'since'?

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    #5

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    As I see it, when you say something like "I have met a lot of people since I have lived here", it implies that both living there and meeting people started at the same time in the past and continoues up to the present. You could also express the same (more or less) idea using "...since I started to live here" or "...since I moved here" instead.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by Weaver67; 05-May-2015 at 16:03.

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    #6

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    Can I say .............since they had lived here instead?

    I'm still confused with "since" and "two situations describe the context", for example below,
    They seemed have a intimate relationship since they fell in love last year. ---------->Is it correct?
    They had lived here for a long time and had met a lot of friends in this community. ------->Is it also correct?
    Last edited by Polyester; 07-May-2015 at 02:11.

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    #7

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    Can I say .............since they had lived here instead?
    I think you cannot, but I am not a teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    They seemed have a inmate relationship since they fell in love last year.
    I would say 'It seems that they have had an intimate relationship since they fell in love last year'.

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    They had lived here for a long time and had met a lot of friends in this community.
    I would not use the past perfect because there was no other act in the past.

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    #8

    Re: Two situations described in the main clause ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Polyester View Post
    I'm still confused with "since" and "two situations describe the context"
    The thing with since is, when you use the present perfect in such a clause, you usually describe an ongoing state which lasts in parallel with the state or event or course of some action described in the main clause. In such cases, and it is important to note, it does not explicitly describe one single event or action in the past from which something started; however, it doesn't mean that there was no such event. Of course it was, or more precisely, it is implied that it was.

    Let us see:
    1. "I have found lots of friends since I moved here". What do we see after since? A single event in the past described by the verb in the past tense (which best suits that purpose). You moved there once at some point in time in the past. Here, you have stated it clearly.

    2. "I have found lots of friends since I have lived here". This one is different in the sence that there is no mention of any particular event in the past when you started to make friends or to live there - they both started simultaniously at some unspecified time in the past. You are not specific about that (perhaps it is not important here) but that moment, however, is implied. Indeed, it is a usual thing with the present perfect. Consider, for example, the following: "I have always thought that the present perfect is one of the trickiest topic of grammar". As you can see, no mention of when I started to think so - but again, it doesn't say that there was no such point; this is implied.

    Returning to your question "why can't I use ...since I lived?". It is because this verb is a bit tricky, and is very often used as a stative verb (althouh I cannot say "always", which is a dangerous thing to say, from my experience, when it comes to English grammar), that is, to describe states (in this case the state of living somewhere). When you say "...since I lived here, I have found a lot of friends here", it suggests that you finished living there in the past and from that moment onwards you have managed somehow to find a lot of friends there - withougt living there?. Hmmm... Do you think it makes sense? I for one think it doesn't.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by Weaver67; 06-May-2015 at 16:42.

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