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    #1

    this year she missed OR misses

    I had come across the following sentence in one of my exercises. I used the word "missed" but the answer is "misses". Although the word "this year" indicates present tense, I've used "missed" because I'd read it as an opportunity she'd missed (as she has been hospitalised). What am I missing here?
    Thank you!


    - Mrs Lee visits her son, who is studying in Canada, this time every year. However, this year she missed her chance to visit as she has been hospitalised.

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    #2

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    "Missed" is correct.

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    #3

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    Dear Teachers: Would it be possible to use "misses" if the context shows that the sentence is referring to the future? For example: "However, this year she will miss / is going to miss her chance to visit as she has been hospitalized." Thank you.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    referring to the future
    The simple present can refer to the future as long as it is used after such conjunctions as until, when, before, after, as soon as, once...

    Not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    In my opinion, you could use "will miss" or "is going to miss", but not "misses".

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    #6

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    Quote Originally Posted by Oceanlike View Post
    - Mrs Lee visits her son, who is studying in Canada, this time every year. However, this year she misses her chance to visit as she has been hospitalised.
    There's nothing wrong with this sentence if you read it as being part of a narrative in the present tenses. It could be a story; it could be a puzzle. Puzzles are often stated this way. It continues: "If she misses her visit again next year, how long will it be since she saw him last?"

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    #7

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    I feel the same way, MikeNewYork...I would have used "will miss" or "is going to miss". I was stumped because the answer provided was "misses" which, with my limited grasp of the English Language, I would not have used.

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    #8

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    Pardon me, Raymott, please help me to understand your explanation.

    - What does it mean to "read it as being part of a narrative....it could be a puzzle. Puzzles are often stated in this way"?
    (do I position the "question mark" inside or outside of the inverted comma?)

    - Is there a distinction between the two - a narrative and a puzzle? What is your definition of a puzzle in this context?

    Thank you!

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    #9

    Re: this year she missed OR misses

    Maths problems and puzzles in the form of narratives often use the present tense.

    'Erica has two brothers and three sisters. How many Smarties does she need to buy for all the children to have six each?'

    Your question mark is correctly placed outside the inverted commas (quotation marks).

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