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    #1

    the parties concerned

    Hi,

    Could anyone explain what does the below sentence convey?



    It (escaping) refers to removing yourself from a decision when you have an outside interest in one of the parties concerned that might be perceived as affecting your decision.


    What I've concluded making efforts to understand it:

    -There is a decision to make.
    -You have an outside interest in one of the parties concerned (concerned= involved?)
    -This party might be percieved as affecting your decision.
    -You remove yourself from a decision.

    So why You have to remove yourself from a decision? (I'm so confused:( )


    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: the parties concerned

    It (escaping) refers to removing yourself from a decision when you have an outside interest in one of the parties concerned that might be perceived as affecting your decision.
    It is a a badly worded sentence.
    It is about avoiding being in a position where there is likely to be a conflict of interest.

    I would reword the sentence as:

    It (withdrawal) refers to not getting involved in decision-making when you have an interest in the business(concerns) of an organization, that might be perceived as affecting the decisions made.

    not a teacher

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the parties concerned

    Usually, I would refer to that as "recusing", not "escaping". Another possibility would be "disqualifying".

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: the parties concerned

    Could anyone explain what does the below sentence conveys?
    The word order in a question beginning with a modal verb has a different word order. Pattern below:

    "What does it mean?" - Correct
    "Can you tell me what it means?" - Correct. (No 'do' in this version)

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