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  1. B45
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    #1

    I'm sorry but I have to ask this because I think the nuance confuses me: My friend

    I'm sorry but I have to ask this because I think the nuance confuses me:

    My friend says that doing a body weight pull ups mean you are strong. I say:

    My grandpa could do that(body weight pull ups)

    VS

    My grandpa can do that(body weight pull ups)

    What's the difference here when my grandpa 90 and still alive. I'm just trying to counter by saying that that's not a hard thing to do. I don't really know if my grandpa can do it or not.

    Are both okay here?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I'm sorry but I have to ask this because I think the nuance confuses me: My fri

    If you're just trying to say it's easy, you say, "My grandpa could do that". You shouldn't use "can" unless you know he can. These claims are often inflated, and you might be challenged to prove what you've said if you use "can". If you say "could" you can modify the claim (He could do it 20 years ago; He could do it if he wasn't on medications lately, etc)

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I'm sorry but I have to ask this because I think the nuance confuses me: My fri

    In American English, either is fine as long as your grandfather can do it today. If your grandfather were no longer alive, you would have to say could, the past tense. (I would probably say can, but in this case, could is also correct.)

    We punctuate the ends of sentences. We put spaces before parentheses. When building single adjectives out of two or three words we usually hyphenate, as in body-weight. The noun pull-up is usually hypenated, too.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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