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    #1

    deserve of

    Quote from a Harvard open course:
    Suppose that were the moral basis of Harvardís admission policy. What letters would they have to write to people they rejected or accepted for that matter? Wouldnít they have to write something like this; Dear unsuccessful applicant, we regret to inform you that your application for admission has been rejected. Itís not your fault that when you came along society happened not to need the qualities you have to offer. Those admitted instead of you are not themselves deserving of a place, nor worthy of praise for the factors that led to their admission we are in any case only using them and you as instruments of a wider social purpose. Better luck next time.

    Does it make sense to say "deserve of"? It looks odd to me.
    Thanks.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: deserve of

    "Deserve of" will not work.

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    #3

    Re: deserve of

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Deserve of" will not work.
    I find the usage of 'deserve of ' in dictionary.com
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/deserve?s=t
    definition 2
    I just wonder if there's any difference between say "derserve the praise" and "derserve of the praise"?
    Thank you so much.
    Last edited by masterding; 10-May-2015 at 12:30.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: deserve of

    You have messed up the link in your last post. The link leads us back to this thread, not to a dictionary definition.

    We can say:

    He deserves the praise.
    He is deserving of the praise.

    We don't say "He deserves of the praise".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: deserve of

    I'm sorry , I made a mistake, I've corrected the link. so there's no difference in meaning between 'deserve the praise' and 'deservig of the praise'?
    Thank you.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-May-2015 at 12:53. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: deserve of

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    I'm sorry , I made a mistake, I've corrected the link.
    I consider them comma splices, but I am not a teacher.

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    #7

    Re: deserve of

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I consider them comma splices, but I am not a teacher.
    I'm sorry I made a mistake, I've corrected the link.
    What about now?

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: deserve of

    Quote Originally Posted by masterding View Post
    I'm sorry I made a mistake, I've corrected the link.
    I still consider it a comma splice, according to http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/commasplice.htm

    Not a teacher.

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    #9

    Re: deserve of

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I still consider it a comma splice, according to http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/commasplice.htm

    Not a teacher.
    So in your opinion how to fix this comma splice?

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    #10

    Re: deserve of

    You can say:

    I'm sorry. I made a mistake. I've corrected the link.
    I'm sorry I made a mistake. I've corrected the link.

    There is a difference in meaning between "I'm sorry. I made a mistake" and "I'm sorry I made a mistake".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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