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    #1

    He is fair

    What does it mean when someone says "he is fair"? Does it mean "he is just" or "he is white" or both are possible? Thank you.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: He is fair

    Without context, it could mean he is just or that he has fair skin. The context should make it clear which one it is.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: He is fair

    Thank you very much.

    Without context, it could mean he is just or that he has fair skin.

    Another question is : Why didn't you write "Without context, it could mean he is just or he has fair skin.", omitting the word 'that' ? Thank you.
    Last edited by unityisgood; 12-May-2015 at 00:00. Reason: Additional question by quoting

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: He is fair

    "That" is often optional when it is not the subject of a relative clause.

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    #5

    Re: He is fair

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Without context, it could mean he is just or that he has fair skin.
    Another question is : Why didn't you type "Without context, it can mean he is just or that he has fair skin.", substituting the word 'could' with 'can'? Thank you.

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    #6

    Re: He is fair

    Another question might be: "Why do you think 'can' would be better here?"

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    #7

    Re: He is fair

    I guess that the sentence is in present tense so it is logical to use the word 'can'.

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    #8

    Re: He is fair

    No, 'could' is not being used here as a past tense of 'can'. It's used as an indication of possibility in the present.

    Example dialogue:
    A: "I'm feeling a bit dizzy"
    B: "It could be the heat." (Not "It can be the heat", even though they are talking about right now.)

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    #9

    Re: He is fair

    (Not "It can be the heat", even though they are talking about right now.)
    Did you forget to type the word 'it' in the quote above so that it sounds as : (Not "It can be the heat", even though they are talking about it right now.) ? Sir emsr2d2, I would like to make a deal with you. Please email me at : [EMAIL REMOVED - AGAIN] Thank you.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 12-May-2015 at 21:42. Reason: Additional question by user. Email address removed by moderator.

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    #10

    Re: He is fair

    "It" was not omitted. By saying "they are talking about right now", Raymott meant "they are talking about the time period which is happening now, at the time they are talking".

    Imagine that this conversation is taking place right now, somewhere in the world:

    John: Yesterday, I went to London.
    Jane: Yesterday, I went to Barcelona.
    Q: What are John and Jane talking about?
    A: They are talking about yesterday/what they did yesterday. (Not "They were talking about it yesterday". We already know they are talking about it now.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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