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    #1

    She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    This is not my homework.

    Which of the following is correct and if both are correct ,do they have same meaning?

    1:- She asked for an hour leave.
    2:-She asked for an hour's leave.


    Thank you in advance for replying.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    Only 2 is correct.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Question Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Only 2 is correct.
    Not sure I understand that. Hour's would be possessive with the apostrophe. Shouldn't it be a plural in the OP's case?

    hour (singular)
    hours (plural)
    hour's (possessive)

    Ticking time is kept by the count of seconds, minutes, and hours.

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    #4

    Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    Shouldn't it be a plural in the OP's case?
    No:

    I asked for an hour's leave. (singular)
    I asked for two hours' leave. (plural)

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    I would not call an absence of one hour 'leave'. I'd say 'She asked for an hour off'.

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    #6

    Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    I guess it depends on where you're working. I wouldn't think of one hour as leave; I need the whole day off to think of it as that.

  3. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: She asked for an HOUR/HOUR'S leave.

    Where I work, half a day is the standard smallest amount of leave that can be taken. So, you can take either the morning or afternoon off.

    However, due to various commitments, we now have several employees who take their leave in hourly chunks.

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