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    #1

    long sentences

    Something that was surprisingly baffling to me in this test was if making this long sentences appreciated in formal English or they could be considered pedant!


    Following the guidelines for speaking and voting established by the book Robert’s Rules of Order, ………….. during meetings.

    1. and avoid large decision-making organizations’ procedural confusion
    2. large decision-making organizations avoid procedural confusion
    3. is procedural confusion avoided by large decision-making organizations
    4. are avoiding procedural contusion in large decision-making organizations


    I answered 'c.'

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    #2

    Re: long sentences

    3 says that "following the guidelines" is "procedural confusion." That's not right.

    Try #2.

    The sentence would be better if it started with a "by." By following the guidelines ... organizations avoid procedural confusion.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: long sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    Something that was surprisingly baffling to me in this test was whether making this long sentences is appreciated in formal English or they could be considered pedantic!


    Following the guidelines for speaking and voting established by the book Robert’s Rules of Order, ………….. during meetings.

    1. and avoid large decision-making organizations’ procedural confusion
    2. large decision-making organizations avoid procedural confusion
    3. is procedural confusion avoided by large decision-making organizations
    4. are avoiding procedural contusion in large decision-making organizations


    I answered 'c.'
    There is no c.

    Because there is a comma after the clause that begins the sentence, everything after the comma must itself must be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.

    So the only choice that works is #2. But the sentence doesn't make much sense. If the sentence had started "By following the guidelines," it would have made sense.

    If the sentence had started with "Follow" instead of "Following," then #1 would be the correct one. It would be a pair of commands in a compound sentence.

    To answer your question, you're right, convoluted sentences often sound pedantic. Make sentences as long as they need to be to say whatever it is you have to say. Naturally, shorter sentences are usually easier to understand.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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    #4

    Re: long sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    everything after the comma must itself must be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.
    So interesting! Is that a general grammar rule?

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: long sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    So interesting! Is that a general grammar rule?
    The ingredients that make a sentence have to be somewhere. It doesn't matter where.

    In that particular sentence, it comes (or wants to come) after the dependent clause that starts with Following.
    I'm not a teacher. I speak American English. I've tutored writing at the University of Southern Maine and have done a good deal of copy editing and writing, occasionally for publication.

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