Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2015
    • Posts: 214
    #1

    Sink Up To

    I have a question about the usage of the verb "sink" here:


    "Wagon sank up to their hubs."


    "Sink" means, loosely, going downward in some liquid. So, the part "up to their hubs" seems weird. Could it be an error?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: Sink Up To

    No. It refers to the hubs of their wheels. Because of their, "wagon" should be "wagons".

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #3

    Re: Sink Up To

    "Up to their hubs" is a way of measuring how deeply they sank. The water (or whatever liquid they were sinking into) came up to the level of the hubs of their wheels.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 837
    #4

    Re: Sink Up To

    Can I say "he sunk the ship by torpedo"?

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: Sink Up To

    "With a torpedo".

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,893
    #6

    Re: Sink Up To

    He sank the ship with a torpedo.
    The ship was sunk​ with a torpedo.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #7

    Re: Sink Up To

    In AmE,"sunk" is also the correct past tense of sink.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #8

    Re: Sink Up To

    The wagons most likely sank in the mud. This was a frequent hazard for those traveling west in the pioneer days.

  6. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,398
    #9

    Re: Sink Up To

    Yup, and still a hazard today on the right (or wrong) road - I've been up to my hubs (or even deeper) before....

Similar Threads

  1. twin sink or double sink
    By moonlike in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2012, 12:58
  2. [Grammar] Sink in the ground
    By Marina Gaidar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Sep-2012, 20:35
  3. let it sink in?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-Apr-2012, 12:30
  4. [Vocabulary] back sink Vs front sink
    By maiabulela in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-Aug-2010, 03:57

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •