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    #1

    Does English have a throat-voice?

    I've written a question about final vowels and now I come here again with another one :)

    I've heard that "many English sounds are articulated in your throat". Is it true? I'm not so sure about it, because I think that "talking in your throat" would hurt, but I've tried and if I do I can pronounce correctly words that were impossible for me first.

    I'm waiting for your opinions :) I'm ready to explain if I weren't clear!

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Does English have a throat-voice?

    I think an explanation might help.

    Can you give us an example of something pronounced in the throat?

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Does English have a throat-voice?

    Are you referring to places of articulation - where sounds are produced? I guess it depends what you mean by 'throat', but there are still only 5 'throat' sounds in English.

    English has a voiceless glottal stop /Ɂ/, represented by the pause between the two syllables in the interjection 'uh-oh', and a voiceless glottal fricative /h/, as in 'high'. Glottal sounds originate near the epiglottis.

    Those are as deep in the throat as you can go in English. However, English also has some velar consonants such as /k/ as in 'cake' , /g/ as in 'go', and /ŋ/ as in 'sing'. These are produced at the vellum, at the very back of the mouth/top of the throat.

    Is this what you mean?

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #4

    Does English have a throat-voice?

    Why not record some sounds and let us hear?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Does English have a throat-voice?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    English also has some velar consonants such as /k/ as in 'cake' , /g/ as in 'go', and /ŋ/ as in 'sing'.
    Italian also has those sounds, so I'm not sure whether that's what the OP means.
    /k/ - che, chi, chianti, words in 'ch', 'ca', 'co', 'cu'; /g/ words in 'gh', 'ga', 'go', 'gu'.
    I'm not sure about /ŋ/.

    Here's an article on articulation with illustration of post-velar sound sites. I can't think of any in English that Skrej hasn't mentioned.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_of_articulation
    Last edited by Raymott; 25-May-2015 at 07:54.

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