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    #1

    Infinitive adverb or adjective

    Infinitive verbs has always been difficult for me to understand. My question is does anyone know the difference between adjective infinitive and adverb infinitive?

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    #2

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    Sorry but is "does anyone know the difference between adjective infinitive and adverb infinitive?" A noun clause?

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    #3

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    The difference between an adjectival infinitive and an adverbial infinitive is the role they play in a sentence.

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    #4

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    If you know the difference between an adjective and an adverb, that will help.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    I know the difference but some infinitive verbs go after noun and I don't know if it is adjective or adverb?

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    #6

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    'The first thing to do is to save him.'── The first to-infinitive functions as an adjective.
    'He struggled to live.'── The to-infinitive functions as an adverb.
    'He wanted to live.'── The to-infinitive functions as a noun.
    Am I right or wrong?
    Quote Originally Posted by mawes12 View Post
    Sorry but is "does anyone know the difference between adjective infinitive and adverb infinitive?" A noun clause?
    I cannot see any noun clause, but I am not a teacher.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 23-May-2015 at 05:07.

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    #7

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    Infinitives can be nouns, adverbs, and adjectives. What they are in particular sentences depends on how they are used.

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    #8

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Mawes:

    Here is some information that may interest you. It comes from two of my favorite books.

    1.. Infinitive phrase as a modifier of a noun: Darius Green's attempt to fly proved a failure.

    2. Infinitive phrase as a modifier of an adjective : She is difficult to please.



    3. Infinitive phrase as a modifier of an adverb: They arrived too late to catch the train.

    a. Some books say that "to catch a train" modifies the adverb "late."
    b. Some books say that "to catch a train" modifies the adverb "too."



    Sources: House and Harman, Descriptive English Grammar (Copyright 1931 and 1950), Second Edition, pages 330 - 332. / Pence and Emery, A Grammar of Every-Day English (Copyright 1947 and 1963), Second Edition, pages 68 -69.

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    #9

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    Sentences like Bill uses his watch to get to work on time and The frail old lady needed someone to cut her lawn get me confused because both infinitives go after nouns but they say that the first sentence is adverb infinitive and the second one is adjective infinitive. I got those sentences from http://teachro.publiccomputingservic...verbalsnav.htm

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    #10

    Re: Infinitive adverb or adjective

    I hope y'all understand and thank y'all for all your help. I really appreciate it and y'all help me learn things I didn't know.

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