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  1. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #1

    Jane picks fine meat.

    Will the following sentence sound OK for a grammar book? (I am writing a handout (booklet / a little textbook) for students and I can use words only with certain sounds in the first unit, so the choice of words is limited):

    Jane picks fine meat.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    It's grammatical inasmuch as it contains four words which exist and which are in the right order. However, I don't know what meaning you are trying to convey with your short sentence. Where is Jane? Is she choosing fine meat over bad meat? Is she choosing fine meat over fine fish? What is the context?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    What do you mean by 'I can use words only with certain sounds in the first unit'?

  3. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    It's about the principle I am using for my textbook on phonetics - not all English sounds are introduced to the students at once in the first unit (which is quite short) and all the sentences in it contain only the sounds that have been introduced. So at the very beginning I need some sentences containing only some certain sounds but in a more or less natural context. What I meant by "Jane picks fine meat" was that Jane always chooses meat of good quality (when she goes to the market). At this stage of studying sounds I don't need super context, it will be fine if the sentence is just possible. So, is the context I've described (about going to the market to buy meat) possible?

    P.S. In tongue twisters we don't usually have great context, do we?
    Last edited by englishhobby; 31-May-2015 at 11:43.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  4. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It's grammatical inasmuch as it contains four words which exist and which are in the right order. However, I don't know what meaning you are trying to convey with your short sentence. Where is Jane? Is she choosing fine meat over bad meat? Is she choosing fine meat over fine fish? What is the context?
    I am writing a textbook on phonetics for my students. At the beginning of the book a number of sounds are introduced and I want to give sample sentences with the introduced sounds only (later I'll add the rest of the sounds, so there'll be no problem with the context, but in this particular unit I need only sentences to practice saying these sounds). Some context is desirable, of course, but the sentences are only aimed to practice some sounds (like tongue twisters, which usually have sense, but still sound rather strange).
    Will it be OK to use this sentence as a kind of a tongue twister (to practice only the target sounds)?
    Here's another example: Ted fixes PCs. (It could be an answer to the question "What does Ted do?)
    Last edited by englishhobby; 31-May-2015 at 11:45.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    "Jane picks fine meat" wouldn't be classed as a tongue twister. It would work as a pronunciation exercise if you are practising the specific sounds in those words.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. englishhobby's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Jane picks fine meat.

    Yes, thank you, I've been thinking hard how to call it
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up. :-)

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