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    #1

    the sentence, including "structure (section) that the material is to be used to make"

    Hello everybody!

    The following is an extract from the course of actions regarding Material Identification and Traceability Procedure.

    Material is released from a warehouse based on a properly written printed form “X”, issued by a person entitled to it.
    The printed form “X” should contain amount/number, grade, sort of material and number or name of structure (section) that the material is to be used to make.

    For the sake of clarity of the sentence, particularly the fragment under discussion, I will call structure (section) structure A and the material will be called material Y.

    Assuming that material A is to be used to make structure A, the bolded fragment could be expressed as "structure A that material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A which material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A material Y is to be used to make".

    If we consider "structure A that material Y is to be used to make", "that" applies to "structure A" and "make".

    If we consider "structure A which material Y is to be used to make", "which" applies to "structure A" and "make".

    Do you understand and accept my reasoning?

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    #2

    Re: the sentence, including "structure (section) that the material is to be used to m

    Are you trying to ask "should I use 'that' or 'which?'"

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    #3

    Re: the sentence, including "structure (section) that the material is to be used to m

    No, what I am trying to do is to ask you if you understand the text in bold. If not, please put me right on that. In my opinion, both "which" and "that" mean the same and can be used interchangeably in the fragment in question. Could you focus on this: Assuming that material A is to be used to make structure A, the bolded fragment could be expressed as "structure A that material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A which material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A material Y is to be used to make".

    Does the following claim make sense to you: Material A is to be used to make structure A, so "structure A that material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A which material Y is to be used to make" or "structure A material Y is to be used to make".

    Your help would be appreciated.
    Last edited by JACEK1; 03-Jun-2015 at 04:33.

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    #4

    Re: the sentence, including "structure (section) that the material is to be used to m

    "X which/that is to be used to make Y" is understandable. It is not if you leave "that/which" out.

    This is where we get the wood which is to be used to make the guitars.

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    #5

    Re: the sentence, including "structure (section) that the material is to be used to m

    I could not agree more but I would stick to "Y which/that X is to be used to make". I think "X which/that is to be used to make Y" = "Y which/that X is to be used to make".

    Structure A that material Y is to be used to make could be replaced by structure A that/which material Y is to be used for or structure A for which material Y is to be used.

    Do you confirm?

    "To make" would be tantamount to "for".

    Do you confirm?

    Thank you.

    Is the structure "to make" in the sentence impossible for you to accept or awkward in comparison with "for"?

    Do you prefer "to make" to "for"?

    Could someone answer my question?
    Last edited by JACEK1; 05-Jun-2015 at 15:29.

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