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    #1

    Article "a"

    I am thinking about taking a holiday.

    Does the above sentence means taking a holiday for one day. [since we have used "a"]

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Article "a"

    No. The holiday could be longer.

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    #3

    Re: Article "a"

    A holiday can last anything from a couple of days to a couple of years depending on your circumstances and finances! I wouldn't call one day of anything a holiday. If someone takes a day's leave from work, their co-workers might say "He's not in. He's on holiday today" but the general term is "He's on leave today".

    I once went to Venice (Italy) from the UK for one day. I didn't say I was there on holiday. I said I took a day trip there.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: Article "a"

    Since we used " a holiday" so I thought that the holiday is for a day since we use "a" for single element. For example: I need a car.

    A car means that I want to buy one car. Please let me know where am I wrong?

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    #5

    Re: Article "a"

    "A holiday" is one event. It can take place over more than one day.

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    #6

    Re: Article "a"

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    Since we used " a holiday" so I thought that the holiday is for a day since we use "a" for single element.
    But the single element of the holiday is the duration, the period of time, and not one day, so a seven-day holiday is one period of time, your single element.

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    #7

    Re: Article "a"

    Etymologically,you might be right, since it derived from Holy Day. But that was ages ago.


    Word Origin and History for holidayExpand
    n.1500s, earlier haliday (c.1200), from Old English haligdæg "holy day; Sabbath," from halig "holy" (see holy )+ dæg "day" (see day ); in 14c.meaning both "religious festival" and "day of recreation," but pronunciation and sense diverged 16c. As a verb meaning "to pass the holidays" by 1869.
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/holiday





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    #8

    Re: Article "a"

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post

    Does the above sentence mean taking a holiday for one day, since it uses "a"?
    .

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    #9

    Re: Article "a"

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    .
    Can you please explain why "s" won't be used in "mean". I understand in present tense we use 's" except when we use I, We, You, they. For example: He walks, He plays, They play.

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    #10

    Re: Article "a"

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    Can you please explain why "s" won't be used in "mean".
    Because the auxiliary verb 'Does' was already used before the full verb 'mean'.

    Not a teacher.

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