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    #1

    It is a long

    1)It is a long journey.
    The journey is long.

    2) It is only ten minutes walk.
    The distance is only ten minutes through walk.

    Do both the sentences convey the same meaning.

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It is a long

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    1)It is a long journey.
    The journey is long.

    2) It is only a ten-minute walk.
    The distance is only ten minutes through walk.

    Do both the sentences in each pair convey the same meaning?
    The first pair mean the same thing.

    I crossed out the second sentence in #2 because it's ungrammatical, unnatural and also because distance is not measured in minutes!

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It is a long

    Where I live, distance is often measured in minutes.

    How far are you from Manhattan? About 45 minutes.
    How far are you from my apartment? About 20 minutes by cab.

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    #4

    Re: It is a long

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    The first pair mean the same thing.

    I crossed out the second sentence in #2 because it's ungrammatical, unnatural and also because distance is not measured in minutes!
    Can you please explain why can't we use "s" in minute and Is "the" is incorrect as we have used "in each pair"?

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    #5

    Re: It is a long

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    Can you please explain why can't we use "s" in minute
    'Ten-minute' is an adjective, which does not take an 's'.

    Quote Originally Posted by suniljain View Post
    Is "the" is incorrect as we have used "in each pair"?
    I would say 'both sentences' or 'both of the sentences' but not 'both the sentences'.

    Not a teacher.

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    #6

    Re: It is a long

    Originally Posted by suniljain
    Is "the" is incorrect as we have used "in each pair"?



    I would say 'both sentences' or 'both of the sentences' but not 'both the sentences'.

    May I write:

    Do both the above sentences convey the same meaning?

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    #7

    Re: It is a long

    I would say 'both of the above sentences', but I am not a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: It is a long

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Where I live, distance is often measured in minutes.

    How far are you from Manhattan? About 45 minutes.
    How far are you from my apartment? About 20 minutes by cab.
    To me these sentences are estimating duration rather than measuring distance.

    The point is that I would not naturally use "minutes" if I was talking about "distance" as such.

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    #9

    Re: It is a long

    Obviously, others see it differently.

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    #10

    Re: It is a long

    It is completely natural and extremely common to respond to distance questions with time.

    In fact, I typically do answer distance with time, unless somebody has specifically asked me how many miles.

    I could tell you that of the two nearest major cities from me, one's just under a 3 hour drive and the other's a good 4 hours, but I honestly couldn't tell you how many actual miles either one is. If I were to ask my friends, they'd answer similarly, in hours.

    Mileage doesn't vary, but the time does depending on variables such as traffic, weather, who's driving, etc. So, people are more interested in the time than the actual number of miles. You can still give a sense of the linear distance though by specifying if it's a 5 minute walk, a 10 minute ride, a 2 hour flight, and so on.

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