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    #1

    fit between

    Quote from a Harvard open course:
    One of them is the moral permissibility of various practices, the other is the fit between certain practices, whatever their moral permissibility, with the honor or recognition that the state should accord in allowing marriage.
    ...
    whatís the principle that youíre appealing? Whatís the argument that you have in mind?
    My questions:
    1.The usage of "the fit between with" seems weird to me. Shouldn't we say "fit between certain practices and the honor or recognition" here?
    2.It seems to me that both "accord" and "appealing" need a preposition here, ie., accord with ,appealing to. I'm not sure if I am right.
    Thank you.
    Last edited by masterding; 21-Jun-2015 at 15:40.

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    #2

    Re: fit between

    A bit more of the context before your 1st sentence would help clarify things.

    1. No, it's talking about the fit between certain practices along with the honor/recognition the state should allow.
    2. No, they're correct as written, because 'accord' and 'appealing' are used as verbs here.

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    #3

    Re: fit between

    No, they're correct as written, because 'accord' and 'appealing' are used as verbs here.
    But I think they are intransitive verbs here , should they not be followed by a preposition where there's an object there?
    Last edited by masterding; 22-Jun-2015 at 05:28.

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    #4

    Re: fit between

    They are transitive verbs in these examples.

    The state should accord the right/honor.
    You're appealing the principle.

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    #5

    Re: fit between

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    They are transitive verbs in these examples.

    The state should accord the right/honor.
    You're appealing the principle.
    Does 'accord' mean "to grant; bestow: " here?
    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/accord?s=t
    definition 3
    But I can't find the fitting definition of appeal in the dictionary. Can you give me a link of it?
    Thank you so much.

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    #6

    Re: fit between

    Yes, that's the definition of 'accord' being used here.

    For a definition of 'appeal', look at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/appeal. You'll have to scroll down the page a ways to the verb defintions, but look at the 2nd transitive verb definition.

    Or definition A at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/appeal?s=t

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    #7

    Re: fit between

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    Yes, that's the definition of 'accord' being used here.

    For a definition of 'appeal', look at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/appeal. You'll have to scroll down the page a ways to the verb defintions, but look at the 2nd transitive verb definition.

    Or definition A at http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/appeal?s=t
    Defintion A is "to apply for review of (a case) to a higher tribunal".
    But It's not a law case ,they are just kind of debating about the issues of same sex marriage.

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    #8

    Re: fit between

    I'd need to see some more of the text then, but it sounds like the 'court' they're referring to could be what's sometimes referred to as the 'court of public opinion'.

    You could appeal your case to the public - it's not a literal legal court, but rather a metaphor for swaying public opinion.

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    #9

    Re: fit between

    Here's more context:
    Hannah: I’d just like to ask a question to Mark, ah, let’s say you got married to a woman, you did not have sex with her before marriage, and then when you became married, it became evident that you were an infertile couple. Do you think it should be illegal for you to engage in sex if you, if children will not result from that act?
    Mark: Yeah, I, I think that it is moral, that’s why I gave the, the two fold purpose. So like, a woman, say, I think older couples can get married, someone, a woman who is beyond, umm, she’s already had menopause and who can’t have a child, because I think that sex has these, it has purposes beyond procreation.
    Hannah: I hate to be uncouth, but have you ever engaged in masturbation?
    Michael Sandel: Alright, you don’t have to answer that. You can. Just a minute. Why? No. Make your, make your argument.
    Mark: I’d like to respond to that.
    Michael Sandel: Wait, we’ve done pretty well over a whole semester and we’re doing pretty well now dealing with questions that most people think can’t even be discussed in a university setting and Hannah you got you have a powerful point, make that point as a general argument rather than, rather than an interrogative, but make the point. what’s the principle that you’re appealing? What’s the argument that you have in mind?

    When we say 'appeal a case' , does it mean that we apeal against the case, or appeal in favor of the case?
    Thank you so much.
    Last edited by masterding; 23-Jun-2015 at 08:11.

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    #10

    Re: fit between

    It could be either way, depending upon context. In this context, she's appealing in favor of her case (argument). She's trying to persuade others to agree with her.

    However, let's say you're involved in a court case, and the court rules against you. Then you might appeal that case, in which case you'd be appealing against the ruling.

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