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    #1

    Talking A bag of chips

    Hi I want to know the meaning of "a bag of chips" I found it in this context

    Events that used to leave me reeling,with my head in a bag of chips,nolonger even faze me.

    ** Thank you so much for your all answer .

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A bag of chips

    I have no idea.

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    #3

    Re: A bag of chips

    It might mean that the person would eat a bag of chips as comfort food when upset.

  2. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: A bag of chips

    Re:

    Quote Originally Posted by Goodafter Noon View Post
    ** Thank you so much for your all answer .
    "Thank you for your help" makes sense, especially if the person has actually helped you. However, the sentence in question does not make sense. Also, if you wish to express your thanks for something you can just click on the Thank button.


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    #5

    Re: A bag of chips

    It is ambiguous, if not vanishingly vague. I pictured someone throwing up into the packet of crisps.

  4. Tarheel's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: A bag of chips

    I am not hungry anymore. Especially not for chips.

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    #7

    Re: A bag of chips

    The sentence should look like this, Goodafter Noon:

    Events that used to leave me reeling,[space[with my head in a bag of chips,[space]no[space]longer even faze me.

    Where did you find it?

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    #8

    Re: A bag of chips

    Without knowing whether the writer was using BrE or AmE, it's impossible to say whether they meant:

    1. What I (BrE) call a bag of chips/a portion of chips (fried potatoes from a fish and chip shop)



    or 2. I believe this is a bag of chips in AmE but for me (BrE) it's a bag/packet of crisps.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bag of crisps.jpeg   Portion-of-chips-006.jpg  
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: A bag of chips

    I don't think it really makes much difference which kind of chips it is referring to. Seems to me it works equally well (and is equally oblique) regardless of which kind of chip.

    If you're eating for comfort when stressed by a particular situation (which I agree seems to be the intended meaning), both are comfort foods. I can't see how either one really changes the meaning of the sentence.

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    #10

    Re: A bag of chips

    I can't say I've ever found comfort in a simple bag of crisps. However, I have been known to demolish a huge portion of chips from the local chip shop when I'm upset. I simply gave that information to explain why 2 responses up to that point seemed to have used a slightly different definition of "bag of chips" and I thought the OP would be interested in that difference.

    Still, I take your point. We can only assume that certain events in the writer's life once led him/her to take solace in a bag of chips but those events no longer have that effect.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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