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    #1

    bread names

    I odered a western omelette at a deli store. The omelette came with a bread. The deli emplyee asked what kind of bread I want. I didn't know how to say it, so she pointed to a long shaped bread and regular sliced square bread loaf. I just wonder how I call the long shaped bread and regular sliced square bread loaf, so next time I know how to say specifically. Also, how do I call the workers work behind the counter who both works as a cashier and prepare the food in the small deli store?

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    #2

    Re: bread names

    Without seeing a picture, I can only guess, but since you were at a deli, I suspect you were offered what's called a 'deli roll'. They're a type of oval roll, often split in half to make sandwiches. Did it look something like this?





    If so, it was a 'deli roll'.

    The regular square/rectangular piece of bread would be called a 'slice' or 'piece' of bread.

    Also note, that in your original post, you can't say "came with a bread' - bread is non-count. The omelette/omelet came with bread.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails deli rolls.jpg  

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    #3

    Re: bread names

    Thank you so much for your detailed answer.
    The long shaped roll what I saw was longer than this deli roll. I found it is close to sub roll or portugese roll. I don't know if it common to call it sub roll or portugese roll in America. Please let me know.
    Also, if the rolls in your picture are all called deli rolls, how do you know what you mentioned is long one or round one.
    One more question is what is name of the worker who prepares the food in small deli, deli worker or chef?
    Last edited by jokaec1; 02-Jul-2015 at 08:41.

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    #4

    Re: bread names

    I think you'll find all kinds of variation regionally. I have never heard "deli roll." The long ones there I would call a "sausage roll" or a "hoagie roll." The round is a "sandwich bun" or "hamburger bun."

    I would expect toast with an omelette. Is this an egg sandwich of some sort?

    Why not ask the worker what your choices are to see what she says? Or ask for a take out menu and see if they list options there.

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    #5

    Re: bread names

    The round ones might be Kaiser rolls as well. Hard to say for sure.

    Yes, there are many different names, and they vary not only by region but by purpose, styles, flour, etc. If in doubt, you'd be safe just calling it a roll, even if you're not 100% sure which kind of roll. A roll is a roll is a roll....


    As Dave suggested, just go with whatever the shop calls it. Two different shops might call the same thing something different.

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    #6

    Re: bread names

    jokaec1, I really appreciate your questions about the bread. There is a bewildering array of choices when it comes to breads and coffees in the US. I recently saw a movie called English Vinglish which has a scene in which an Indian lady (who doesn't know English well) goes to a deli (or a coffee shop?) on her first trip to the US and faces all these choices she is not equipped to make, and it results in her bursting into tears because of embarrassment. If you want, you can watch the short clip here. (the clip is 4m:30sec long, but you can stop at 2:50).

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    #7

    Re: bread names

    Hi, Olympian, thank you so much for providing this movie clip. It is very touching! Maybe some of the native English speakers can't completely understand how much embarrassment a foreigner will face until they watch this movie. My wife asked me why I was learning English so diligently. I answered to her that I didn't want to be insulted in public, especially by some mean guys. I had some similar unpleasant experiences. I know most of people are very nice and some insults happen unintentionally, but it doesn't mean those insults happen occassionally are acceptable. Thank you again for providing this movie clip.
    Last edited by jokaec1; 03-Jul-2015 at 14:18.

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    #8

    Re: bread names

    BTW, I'm not clear about what is the difference between "movie clip" and "movie footage". Which one is more appropriate to be used in comments above? Thank in advance.
    My research from dictionary:
    movie footage: part of a film showing a particular event
    movie clip:a short part of a film/movie that is shown separately
    Last edited by jokaec1; 03-Jul-2015 at 16:48.

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    #9

    Re: bread names

    They're essentially the same. Perhaps 'clip' implies a shorter viewing time, just a quick excerpt.

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    #10

    Re: bread names

    Quote Originally Posted by jokaec1 View Post
    Hi, Olympian, thank you so much for providing this movie clip. It is very touching! Maybe some of the native English speakers can't completely understand how much embarrassment a foreigner will faces until they watch this movie. My wife asked me why I was learning English so diligently. I answered to her that I didn't want to be insulted in public, especially by some mean guys. I had some similar unpleasant experiences. I know most of people are very nice and some insults happen unintentionally, but it doesn't mean those insults that happen occassionally are acceptable. Thank you again for providing this movie clip.
    Jokaec1, you are welcome. I understand you completely. I agree that some insults happen unintentionally (as was the case in the movie clip which showed a high pressure environment under which the employee was taking orders), but it is very unpleasant and I would like to spare no efforts in educating and informing myself in advance if possible.

    I wish to share a quotation that you may find consoling (although it is meant for the native speakers who speak only one language). Needless to say, this applies to any language, not just English.

    Never make fun of someone who speaks broken English. It means they know another language.” ― H. Jackson Brown Jr.
    Last edited by Olympian; 04-Jul-2015 at 00:22. Reason: suggested corrections to quoted text

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