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  1. Moderator
    Retired English Teacher
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    #11

    Re: Take On, Take Up

    They both mean the same to me.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
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    #12

    Re: Take On, Take Up

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    "Seeing a stranger with a menacing look, John squared up"

    The thing is I learnt this phrasal verb today and I thought it would worked in that sentence.
    That is better.

  3. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Take On, Take Up

    As a first language English speaker (but not a Teacher) I would say both are equally correct and work equally well.

    The phrase "squared up" cannot be used as a replacement for "Take on" or "Take up" in the sentences. It would however be used in one such as "John squared up to Bill for a fight".

    So in the first sentence you could make it work as "Lief gritted his teeth and squared up ready to challenge the man again.". However, squared up doesn't work in the second sentence at all without completely re-writing it. I think it's because it means to take on a fighting stance in direct opposition to someone or perhaps something such as a storm.
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 04-Jul-2015 at 00:03.

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