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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    When to use "may" and "might"

    Sentence: You might snack on bananas for breakfast.
    Q. Can we say "You may" instead of "You might" in the above sentence?

    I'm getting confused on when to use "may" and "might"? Will you please give me some examples on both of these? Thanks.

  2. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    I'm not a teacher nor native speaker.

    In your sentence "may" and "might" have the same meaning.
    Try to do a research on your own and if you still have problems, feel free to come back and ask questions.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #3

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    Type may/might in the Google Custom Search box near the top of the page. You will find links to previous answers to your question.

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    #4

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Hariharakumar:

    In my opinion, only "might" would work in your sentence:

    James: I have to lose some weight. So I have decided to stop eating dinner every day.

    Mona: You don't have to stop eating dinner completely. You might [a suggestion] snack on bananas. They don't have too many calories.

    James: Thank you, Mona. I may [a possibility] do just that.

    *****

    IF you are NOT making a suggestion to another person, then you can use either modal verb.

    "This evening I may / might snack on bananas." ("May" implies a stronger possibility. "Might" is weaker.")
    Last edited by TheParser; 02-Jul-2015 at 18:33.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    Is it correct to say "snack on something for breakfast"?

  4. teechar's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    It can work in the right context.

  5. Newbie
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    #7

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    *Not a teacher*
    I understood that "may" is to be used referencing the future; "I may go to the store if it stops raining", and "might", for the past; "I might have gone to the store had it stopped raining".

    Is this incorrect?

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: When to use "may" and "might"

    Yes, it's incorrect. Besides, you're comparing different structures. If you want to compare 'may' and might', you need to contrast "I may go to the store" with "I might go to the store", or contrast "I may have gone" with "I might have gone."

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