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    #1

    Usage of "Clear"

    I have a question about the usage of the verb "clear" here:


    "Sittenfeld is new to politics; the sum total of his electoral experience consists of serving on the Cincinnati City Council for the last four years. He is only 30 years old. If he wins next November, he would just barely clear the Senate’s Constitutional age requirement."


    I cannot find a dictionary definition that fits this usage of the verb "clear". Could this be an error?

  1. Skrej's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Usage of "Clear"

    You need a better dictionary.

    Check definition #7 under verbs.

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    #3

    Re: Usage of "Clear"

    @Skrej
    The definition 7a & 7b are:



    --7a : to go over, under, or by without touching <the ball just cleared the uprights>
    --7b : to move through successfully : pass <the bill cleared the legislature>



    7a deals with physical objects, so doesn't work for my example. The definition of 7b implies that the legislature approves the bill. Applying that definition to the example sentence in post #1 would suggest that


    "A candidate clears the age requirement" == "The age requirement approves a candidate"

    , which does not really work.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Usage of "Clear"

    Sigh. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.


    Where does it say it has to have physical object??!?!? Absolutely nowhere.

    7B is NOT restricted just to legislation, and it doesn't mean approve, it means pass. See the little blue hyper-linked word?

    You need to understand that dictionary examples are just representative, not all-inclusive or exclusive. You have to realize (if you're not purposely trolling), that dictionaries require you to extend their examples beyond just the single example given.

    By clearing the age limit, he passed it, or he just barely missed the age limit, either way.

    Horses and runners clear hurdles. Trucks need to clear a height limit when going under a low underpass. The bill cleared the council vote. They all mean 'pass', as in not hit or not get stopped.

    And before you make your usual 'obvious to only native speakers comment', no, it's clear (1st adjective definition at top of page) that the fault lies with your interpretation, not the dictionary or the usage.

    I'm going to stop answering these posts, because it appears you're just looking for an argument.

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