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  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #31

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I don't see "above" as an adverb in "the book above".
    I think MikeNewYork's point is that the modifier of a noun should not be an adverb.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ..."the stars which are above."
    In such a sentence, many grammarians point out that "are" is not a linking verb. It means something like "to exist."
    I think their point is that 'are' is the main verb modified by the adverb 'above'.

    I consider both points possible, but I am not a teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    From now on, I shall not bother you with my humble comments.
    Your 'bothering' comments have in fact helped many learners.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    Thank you for the link.
    You are welcome.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 09-Jul-2015 at 08:28.

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #32

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    That's only my guess, Matthew.


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    #33

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    She stared [up] [at the stars] [above].

    1. She stared [up].
    2. She stared [at the stars].
    3. She stared [above].

    Well, my guess is that those words in brackets function adverbially - they all modify the verb 'stared'.

    I'm not a grammarian!
    I think if those sentences were separate like the way you list them, I would agree.

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    #34

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post


    I think their point is that 'are' is the main verb modified by the adverb 'above'.







    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    That is, indeed, what many reputable grammarians believe.

    One expert explains:

    1. "Those hills up ahead aren't mountains." ("up ahead" is an adverb phrase.)

    a. It is a shorter version of "Those hills which are up ahead aren't mountains." (Only my note: "Those mountains which exist up ahead aren't mountains.")

    Source: Constance Weaver, Grammar for Teachers (1979).


    2. Four famous experts give this example:

    "The people behind were talking all the time."

    a. According to those four experts, there are two explanations:

    i. "The people who were sitting behind were talking all the time." (They say "behind" is an adverb here.)
    ii. "The people who were sitting behind [us] were talking all the time." (They explain that "behind" is a preposition with an omitted object.)


    Source: Quirk et al., page 1293.

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    #35

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    2. Four famous experts give this example:

    "The people behind were talking all the time."

    a. According to those four experts, there are two explanations:

    i. "The people who were sitting behind were talking all the time." (They say "behind" is an adverb here.)
    ii. "The people who were sitting behind [us] were talking all the time." (They explain that "behind" is a preposition with an omitted object.)
    I think the prepositional phrase is working like an adverb even though you are correct.

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #36

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by mawes12 View Post
    the prepositional phrase
    I can't see any prepositional phrase in the quote, but I am not a teacher.

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    #37

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I can't see any prepositional phrase in the quote, but I am not a teacher.
    "behind us" is a prepositional phrase from what I know but I might be wrong.

    not a teacher.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #38

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    'Behind us' is a prepositional phrase but 'us' seems to have been omitted from the example.

    Not a teacher.

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    #39

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    'Behind us' is a prepositional phrase but 'us' seems to have been omitted from the example.

    Not a teacher.
    Yeah, that's why I think they both act like an adverb.

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    #40

    Re: Preposition, adverb, and adjective

    "Behind (us)" defines "people"; therefore, it is adjectival.

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