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    #1

    I have a question about more than to any other factor

    Hello.
    I wonder if these two sentences below have the same meaning
    and I wonder if the first sentence sounds natural.

    In a study of 500 marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is closely linked to communication skill more than to any other factor

    In a study of 500 marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is more closely linked to communication skills than to any other factor

    I'll really appreciate it if you answer this

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    #2

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    Quote Originally Posted by yjn532 View Post
    In a study of 500 marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is more closely linked to communication skills than to any other factor
    We pluralize "skills" because we tend to think that there are different kinds of individual communication skills involved. Also, "more than" should not be followed by preposition "to".

  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    I think the first version is wrong.
    (A period/full stop is needed at the end of each sentence, by the way.)
    I agree with cs4english about the use of the word 'skill'.
    However, I personally feel, as a non-native speaker of English, that the preposition 'to' is required there.
    Please correct me if I'm wrong.


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    #4

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    I'd say 'to' was optional.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    'In a study of 500 marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is linked to communication skills more closely than any other factor.'
    Is it grammatical?
    Not a teacher.

  3. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    Naturally, in yjn532's original sentence I would use:

    "In a study of 500 five hundred marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is closely linked to communication skills rather more than to any other factor".

    However, I agree with Rover_KE that use of the second "to" is optional.

    With Matthew's sentence, it seems alright to me as a speaker but I will let the Teachers comment on the grammar. However, I would probably naturally use the following version in writing or speech:

    'In a study of 500 five hundred marriages, one researcher determined that marital success is more closely linked to communication skills more closely than to any other factor.'

    A note about "500" in the sentences above:
    When I was taught English we were not allowed to write numbers in sentences as figures. So, I would probably naturally write many of them out in full unless they were huge numbers. I'm not sure when, or if, it became acceptable to use figures instead. In newspapers you will probably often see numbers used, however, in older books, especially novels, you will probably see it used much less if at all.
    Last edited by Eckaslike; 09-Jul-2015 at 07:59. Reason: Removing typos

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: I have a question about more than to any other factor

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    I think the first version is wrong.
    I think this is because 'more' is used to modify 'closely', so they should not have been separated, but I am not a teacher.

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