Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    elision/assimilation here?

    Hi! I have the following utterance here:

    [. . .] to advertise, market and distribute tobacco products to our kids...

    /ˈdɪstrɪbjuːt təˈbękəʊ/

    Is there any connected speech phenomena applying here regarding the /t/ sound? Because I don't pronounce both /t/ sounds, just one of them, but how do i transcribe it then? /ˈdɪstrɪbjuː təˈbękəʊ/ or /ˈdɪstrɪbjuːt əˈbękəʊ/? I know I should maybe write it in one word, but my lecturer don't want us to.

    I'm thankful for every help that I get. I'm sorry if my English is not good.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: elision/assimilation here?

    There are three T's in "distribute tobacco". When I speak the phrase, I pronounce all of them.

  2. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 1,678
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: elision/assimilation here?

    It's hard to say without hearing your actual pronunciation. A phonetic transcription would depend on your pronunciation.

    You say you don't pronounce some of the /t/ sounds. Is that because you're leaving them out (elision), or because the sound of /t/ is changed because it has merged with another sound (assimilation)? Which /t/ do you leave out? Transcription will need to reflect which /t/ is missing.

    Many times, the two go hand in hand. If you elide a phoneme, then the phonemes on either side of that missing sound may start to assimilate, which is different than assimilating one pair of the three phonemes.

    In other words, with assimilation, a sound sort of just gets (well) hidden or covered up, where with elision it's completely lost.

    Although since your native language is German, I'm betting it's more likely elision with the particular set of words. German tends to elide /t/ when it occurs in multi-sibilant plosive combinations, which is what you've got in 'distribute tobacco'. That phrase is full of sibilants and stops.

    I'd wager that you're eliding that 2nd /t/ in distribute, but that's just a guess based on a few beers.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 2
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: elision/assimilation here?

    Yes, Skrej, you're right. It's the second "t" which I'm eliding. So you pronounce all of them? That would mean that there's no phenomenom at all :D But it sounds so weird to me.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 6,585
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: elision/assimilation here?

    Many English people would actually pronounce the first /t/ but not release it. They would then continue straight to the second /t/, which is the one that is not exploded. If you are really pronouncing only one /t/, then you will sound unnatural.

    If you know any native speakers, get them to say naturally "In Ireland they use euros, but in England they stick to the pound" and "Tourism is now the main source of income, but tin mining was the main source for hundreds of years". In the first, you'll hear the single aspirated /t/ in 'but in'. In the second, in 'but tin', some people, especially if they are enunciating clearly, will pronounce two aspirated /t/ sounds. If they are speaking naturally however, you'll hear what could be taken as a single /t/, but is in fact an unexploded /t/ followed by the exploded/aspirated one, with no gap between. If you have a very good ear, you'll notice that this sound is longer than the single /t/. The aspiration is more pronounced in 'but tin' than in 'but in'. This is the situation with 'distribute tobacco'. MikeNewYork, who pronounces two clear /t/ sounds in '...bute tobacco' is in the minority of native speakers if he does that in informal conversation, though it's not uncommon in more formal speech

    Some speakers of American English voice the /t/ in 'but in' so that it can sound like a /d/. They do not voice the /t/ in 'tin'.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] Elision of Schwa sound (II)
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2015, 22:48
  2. Elision of phoneme /h/ in conversation.
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 16-Dec-2013, 05:57
  3. Elision of Schwa sound
    By The apprentice in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-Dec-2013, 01:55
  4. elision
    By peter123 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2008, 19:14
  5. Help! Ellipsis or elision?!
    By Sarah_2005 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Jun-2005, 04:16

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •