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  1. Banned
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    #1

    nun

    If someone is not a catholic, can he/she call the nun Teresa "Mother Teresa" or just "Nun Teresa"?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: nun

    Yes, there are Buddhist and Hindu nuns, but they probably wouldn't be called 'Mother Teresa'. I don't think there are Protestant nuns, or Islamic nuns.
    A nun is typically called 'Sister Someone', unless she's the head of an order.

    nun 1

    n.A woman who belongs to a religious order or congregation devoted to active service or meditation, typically living under vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/nun

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nun
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monasticism

    PS: I might have answered the wrong question. Of course a non-Catholic can call Mother Teresa, "Mother Teresa".

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    #3

    Re: nun

    So, a buddhist or protestant can call Mother Teresa "nun Teresa", right?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 10-Jul-2015 at 17:48. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

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    #4

    Re: nun

    They would call her 'Mother (not 'nun') Teresa'.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: nun

    Remember to capitalise religions: Catholic; Buddhist; Protestant; Muslim; Christian etc.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: nun

    In my experience, we use people's proper titles, or English versions them, regardless of our own religion or lack of it:

    So, "Mother Teresa" already has a title which exists in English so we would not change it. Therefore, in English, you would always refer to her as "Mother Teresa". This would nearly always override what any literal translation of a person's title might be from your own language into English.

    In standard usage, it would probably be seen as an insult to the person, group, or country, to use a non-standard English form. Using a non-standard form may be interpreted to mean that you had some form of agenda against them, for whatever reason.

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    #7

    Re: nun

    **** I am not a teacher ****

    Jokaec1, everyone in India calls her "Mother Teresa" and most people in India are not Catholics.

    If you don't mind, I have a question regarding why you had this question. I mean, I am trying to understand if it has anything to do with the way Chinese people use titles and address others. Please correct me if I am wrong in the following:
    A Chinese worker/employee will address his/her manager as "Manager Wang" (for example), but a person who is not an employee in that office will simply address the manager as "Mr Wang" (not as "Manager Wang"). So I am guessing that you are perhaps thinking that if a person is a Catholic, (i.e, similar to the analogy of an employee above), then s/he should address Mother Teresa as "Mother Teresa", but if a person is not a Catholic (similar the analogy of a non-employee calling someone "Mr Wang" and not "Manager Wang") then they should address her as "Nun Teresa". Is that how you came up with the question?

    As others have already explained above, she is called "Mother Teresa". The work she has done for the downtrodden here would make people call her as "Mother", regardless of her formal title as a Catholic.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: nun

    Quote Originally Posted by Olympian View Post
    The work she has done for the downtrodden here would make people call her as "Mother", regardless of her formal title as a Catholic.
    Are you sure? You live in India, so you might be right.
    But 'Mother' is a formal term in the Catholic Church, not a term given by the people. Do you know nuns who are called "Mother" when they are officially only Sisters, and not heads of convents, etc? I think it would be impious for such a nun to allow herself to be called "Mother".


    5. Roman Catholic Churcha. A mother superior.
    b. Used as a form of address for such a woman.

    mother superior

    n. pl. mothers superior or mother superiorsA woman in charge of a religious community of women.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mother

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    #9

    Re: nun

    Duplicate post removed.

  8. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: nun

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Are you sure? You live in India, so you might be right.
    But 'Mother' is a formal term in the Catholic Church, not a term given by the people. Do you know nuns who are called "Mother" when they are officially only Sisters, and not heads of convents, etc? I think it would be impious for such a nun to allow herself to be called "Mother".


    5. Roman Catholic Churcha. A mother superior.
    b. Used as a form of address for such a woman.

    mother superior

    n. pl. mothers superior or mother superiorsA woman in charge of a religious community of women.

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mother

    Raymott,

    From memory, I think that Olympian's meaning may be, that in India someone might be given the additional title "Mother" if they have done great deeds to help the poor, sick, destitute etc., regardless of their usual title. He is meaning that in India she is regarded as "Mother" [official title] + "Mother" [title given to her by the people], simply doubly reinforcing the fact her title is "Mother Teresa".

    Olympian, please correct me if I am wrong. Raymott, just trying to explain what I think Olympian may be meaning rather than challenging what you have said, which is right.

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