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    #1

    dropped up to 11 degrees

    Hello,

    http://www.weather.com/forecast/nati...east-southeast

    - Temperatures in Atlanta dropped to 11 degrees on Thursday morning; the city squeaked just one degree above freezing that afternoon.

    I would like to ask if we can use 'up to' instead of 'to' in the above sentence or not.

    - Temperatures in Atlanta dropped up to 11 degrees on Thursday morning; the city squeaked just one degree above freezing that afternoon.

    I gather it sounds not OK because of the verb 'dropped.' What do you think?

    Thanks.

  1. teechar's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: dropped up to 11 degrees

    Quote Originally Posted by ademoglu View Post
    Temperatures in Atlanta dropped up to 11 degrees on Thursday morning; the city squeaked just one degree above freezing that afternoon.

    I gather it sounds not OK because of the verb 'dropped.' What do you think?
    Not only that, but it might alternatively imply "dropped by up to", which has a different meaning!

    Therefore, use "dropped to" or "dropped down to" in that context.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: dropped up to 11 degrees

    Or "dropped by up to", as you've suggested.
    This means that the temperature dropped by varying amounts in different places in Atlanta - eg. by 9, 10, 11 degrees, with 11 degrees being the largest drop.

  3. Amigos4's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: dropped up to 11 degrees

    The sentence means exactly what it says: the overnight low temperature in Atlanta was 11 degrees. The temperature didn't drop by 11 degrees, the recorded temperature was 11 degrees. ( Actually, as a side note, the official overnight low temperature in Atlanta that night (January 8) was 10 degrees.)

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    #5

    Re: dropped up to 11 degrees

    That's 11 F = -12 C. That's pretty low for Georgia. The high would have been 33 F = 1 C.

  4. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: dropped up to 11 degrees

    Must have been the night that the lights went out in Georgia....

    if you catch the reference.

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