Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2015
    • Posts: 25
    #1

    infinitive of result

    Hi
    Help me!!

    In the next sentence,
    She made a noise on purpose only to bother me at work.

    is the underlined one is the infinitive of result or the infinitive of purpose?


    Thanks in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2009
    • Posts: 6,332
    #2

    Re: infinitive of result

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,

    I have a few ideas (not "answers") to share with you.

    1. Your sentence contains the prepositional phrase "on purpose." So do you think that "to bother" in your sentence is maybe an infinitive of purpose?

    2. Let's delete (remove) the prepositional phrase. We get: "She made a noise only to bother me at work." Maybe we could also express that idea like:

    a. At work, she made a noise only to bother me.
    b. At work, she only made a noise to bother me.
    c. At work, she made a noise only in order to bother me.
    d. At work, she only made a noise in order to bother me.

    *****

    I did some googling, and found this sentence: "Her sinuses would feel better, only to bother her again a few weeks later." (Source: desertspringshospital.com/health)

    In my opinion, the purpose of the sinuses feeling better was NOT to bother her again later. So can we say that "to bother" in that sentence is NOT an infinitive of purpose?

    Here is a good example of an infinitiive of result: "Thema looked up suddenly to find a cat on the chair." (Source: Bruce Liles, A Basic Grammar of Modern English, 1979).

    Only my ideas: (1) I do not think that Thema looked up with the purpose of finding a cat. In fact, it was a surprise. (2) Some people, I think, would add "only" in front of the word "to." They might also add a comma after "suddenly." This pause would further indicate that a clause of result was coming.

    One more example of an infinitive of result: "He raised our expectations only to disappoint them." (Source: Otto Jespersen, Essentials of English Grammar (1933).
    Last edited by TheParser; 16-Jul-2015 at 10:30.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,812
    #3

    Re: infinitive of result

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    So do you think that "to bother" in your sentence is maybe an infinitive of purpose?
    I think the OP may mean that 'to bother' is the purpose of making a noise, but I am not a teacher.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2015
    • Posts: 432
    #4

    Re: infinitive of result

    I think 'to bother' answers why.

    Not a teacher.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] as a result, as a result of, due to, otherwise
    By fish-able in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Oct-2014, 12:11
  2. to infinitive- result or purpose?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2013, 13:31
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-Apr-2012, 04:43
  4. [Vocabulary] combine to infinitive~, result? purpose?
    By atssarbia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Feb-2010, 13:47
  5. infinitive clause to talk about a result
    By enydia in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13-Jun-2008, 03:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •