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  1. bebe heart's Avatar
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    #1

    Post separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    The cackling of geese saved Rome.
    (geese) is subject and (The cackling of, saved Rome) are predicates.
    The boy stood on the burning deck.
    (The boy) is subject and(stood on the burning deck) is predicate.
    Tubal Cain was a man of might.
    (Tubal Cain) is subject and (was a man of might) is predicate.
    Correct me if I made mistakes.

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    #2

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    "The cackling of geese saved Rome."

    What is the verb? Answer: "saved."

    Draw a line in front of the verb: "The cackling of geese | saved Rome."

    Thus the complete subject is "The cackling of geese."

    The complete predicate is "saved Rome."

    *****

    Please identify the complete subject of this sentence: "The student with black hair and a green hat goes to a school on Maple Ave."

    (Just draw a line in front of the verb.)

  2. bebe heart's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    (The student with black hair and a green hat) is subject (goes) is verb (goes to a school on Maple Ave) is predicate.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 20-Jul-2015 at 17:57. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

  3. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by bebe heart View Post
    (The student with black hair and a green hat) is subject (goes) is verb (goes to a school on Maple Ave) is predicate.
    TheParser told you to draw a line in front of ​the verb. The verb is part of the predicate.

  4. bebe heart's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    TheParser told you to draw a line in front of ​the verb. The verb is part of the predicate.
    I am using Android tablet, It does not have this option. Sorry I can't draw a line.

  5. Piscean's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    You don't have to draw one literally. Just think of a line or some other marker.

  6. bebe heart's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    You don't have to draw one literally. Just think of a line or some other marker.
    Thank you!
    Stone walls do not make a prison.
    (Stone walls)is subject, (do not make​ a prison) is predicate.
    Last edited by bebe heart; 20-Jul-2015 at 21:57. Reason: spelling

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    #8

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Excellent job! Congratulations!

    By the way, I believe that it is usually expressed as "Stone walls do not a prison make."

    Sometimes English writers use an unusual word order.

    This unusual order often sounds very nice to the ear. It has a nice rhythm.

    Here is one that I have collected:

    "Close friends these two men were not."

    For analysis, however, you would put the words in regular order: "These two men | were not close friends."

  7. bebe heart's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    But sir, It sound so weird and It's like, the subject is "close friends"​. Also these days it's unnatural to use words in this order. Am I right?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 21-Jul-2015 at 13:43. Reason: Deleting unnecessary quote.

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    #10

    Re: separate the subject and the predicate of sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by bebe heart View Post
    Also these days it's unnatural to use words in this order. Am I right?

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    I agree with you that if you spoke that way all the time, people would, indeed, think that you were weird.

    But occasionally, that order is used for sarcasm, humor, etc. Also, poets feel free to experiment with language.

    Tom goes to a party, for example.

    The hostess (the woman who gives the party): Please have some of these cookies. I baked them myself.

    Tom (who is trying to lose weight): Cookies I don't need! (When he says that, he smiles and touches his abdomen.)

    The hostess will chuckle (gently laugh) and move on to another guest.

    Here is another example from my notes.

    "A stronger mayor does not a tyrant make." (My explanation. Let's say that the mayor of a city wanted more authority. Some people criticized her wish, saying that such authority would make her a tyrant. Her supporters replied with that sentence. It would not have had the same power -- in my opinion -- if her supporters had said something like: "Well, if she gets more authority, that does not necessarily mean that she will be a dictator.")

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