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    #1

    Alveolar plosive and alveolar stop also.

    Dear members and friends.


    In connected speech, as well as in isolated words, when the /t/ and /y/ sounds find each other, they assimilate the /tʃ/ sound as in ''nice to meet you''; I don't want to hurt you''; picture'' and so forth. I would like to know if you native speakers merge the /t/ and /y/ phonemes in the examples below:
    (a) How about you?
    (b) Not yet.
    (c) Mom hasn't cooked yet.

    I've never heard YET merging into another sound which is prior to it.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 20-Jul-2015 at 22:31.

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    #2

    Re: Alveolar plosive and alveolar stop also.

    They merge for me. Unless I am carefully enunciating for emphasis, or some other purpose.

    "Did you eat yet?" in casual conversation sounds like "jew eat jet"?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Alveolar plosive and alveolar stop also.

    I tend not to merge them. I would never say "Did you eat yet?" I would say "Have you eaten (yet)?"

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    #4

    Re: Alveolar plosive and alveolar stop also.

    According to your comments Baisahab and SoothingDave, the pronunciation of the words in my examples might be:

    about you : /əbaʊt juː/ or /əbaʊːʧuː/
    not yet : /nɒt jet/ or /nɒʧet/
    cooked yet: /kʊkt jet/ or /kʊkʧet/

    As you know, the consonant T is part of the alveolar plosive or alveolar stop consonants (p,t,k, b,d,g), and it seems to me that this is the reason (why) they're also called stop consonants; a stop can be made at the /t/ sound, and YOU/YET pronounced alone.

  2. Piscean's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Alveolar plosive and alveolar stop also.

    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    As you know, the consonant T is part of the alveolar plosive or alveolar stop consonants (p,t,k, b,d,g)
    /p/ and /b' are bilabial stops/plosives; /k/ and /g/ are velar.

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