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    #1

    Need help with grammar

    I want to know when I should use "in" or "on" I get very confused on the meaning of the two words.

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    #2

    Re: Need help with grammar

    Welcome to the forum, Mariana.

    Click here to read dictionary definitions of 'in' with many examples of its use. Later, change the search word to 'on'.

    (Bookmark the OneLook site for future reference.)

    Ask again if you have any specific questions.

  1. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Need help with grammar

    They are words used frequently in English. Please could you provide a few example sentences, so that we can see how we can help.

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    #4

    Re: Need help with grammar

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Mariana:

    Please do not be discouraged (don't lose hope).

    As the famous Fowler brothers reminded us, prepositions are a matter of idiom. That is to say, a group of people decide to use a particular preposition.

    So the only way to know which preposition to use is to read widely (and, of course, to live in a particular place).

    In California, people stand in line; in New York, they stand on line.

    In the United States, you live on Maple Drive; in the United Kingdom (I hear) you live in Maple Drive.

    When I was young, many (most?) Americans referred to being on an elevator. Today, I am pretty sure that in is more common.

    Do I write an appointment in or on my calendar? Some people might use on if they are referring to a wall calendar while other people might use in if they are referring to a small, book-like calendar.

    Some people have respectful (of course!) disagreements about which preposition to use with the noun "chair." (Just an ordinary chair with no arms.) I will not give my choice!

    When we refer to the average person, we might say, "What does the man on / in the street think about the government's decision?" I think that it is accurate to say that most Americans would say on, but I have noticed a few well-educated people use in. (By the way, "man" in this context also refers, of course, to "woman.")

    Mothers tell their children not to play in the streets.

    The government says that bicylists have the right to ride their bikes on the streets along with automobiles.

    As I said, please don't be discouraged. Even native speakers do not always agree on which preposition to use in some cases.
    Last edited by TheParser; 22-Jul-2015 at 12:01.

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