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    #1

    The

    Which of the following is wrong?

    - What does John cook on New Year?
    - Where does John go on the New Year Eve/Day?

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    #2

    Re: The

    #1 may be correct in AE. In BE we say 'at New Year'.

    #2 in BE, we say 'Where does John go on New Year's Eve/Day.

    (A better title would have been New Year.)

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    #3

    Re: The

    Many native speaker claim that in the first we should add "Day" after "New Year". They say that we don't have "New Year" alone, in these usages.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: The

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    Many native speaker claim that in the first we should add "Day" after "New Year". They say that we don't have "New Year" alone, in these usages.
    As Rover said, we do In British English. We have 'New Year's Day, not 'New Year Day'.

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    #5

    Re: The

    We have New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. The period covering those two dates is called "New Year". However, note that if you want to know what someone is going to do for the evening of New Year's Eve into New Year's Day (covering midnight when the big celebrations happen), you can ask "What are you doing for New Year?"
    In the same vein, if you ask someone "What are you doing for/at Christmas?", you are probably referring to the general period including Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: The

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Boxing Day.
    That, for those who do not know, is 26 December in The UK and some Commonwealth countries.

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    #7

    Re: The

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post
    Many native speakers claim that in the first we should add "Day" after "New Year". They say that we don't have "New Year" alone, in these usages.
    No offence, Freeguy, but I've known more native speakers than you, and none of them has ever said 'New Year Day'.

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    #8

    Re: The

    I am asking about "the" here.

    - What does John cook on New Year?

    Or

    - What does John cook on the New Year?

    Or even:
    Does your mother buy you presents in the New Year?
    Last edited by Freeguy; 25-Jul-2015 at 07:57.

  4. Piscean's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: The

    Quote Originally Posted by Freeguy View Post

    - What does John cook on New Year?


    - What does John cook on the New Year?
    -
    Does your mother buy you presents in the New Year?
    The first is 'at New Year' or 'on New Year's Day in British English, as we have told you.
    The second is incorrect in British English.
    The third is grammatically possible if you use lower case letters in 'new year' and 'will' instead of 'does'. '... the new year' means 'the early part of next year'.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 25-Jul-2015 at 16:24. Reason: Minor typo correction

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    #10

    Re: The

    We don't use the article with the 'official' names of holiday periods.

    I always eat chocolate at Easter.
    Easter is my favourite time of year.

    What are you doing at/for Christmas?
    Is Christmas your favourite time of year?

    What are your plans for New Year?
    I'm going to my parents' house for New Year this year.


    As you were shown in the last response, "the new year" (with the article and without capital letters) means the early part of January.

    I plan to join a gym and lose weight in the new year.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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