Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 44
    #1

    a cohort of

    Does "a cohort of" underlined here means "a group of"?
    How should I understand the second "cohort" underlined?
    Thanks!


    Grouping teachers into core teams of four, say, means that such teams may assume responsibility for delivering the whole curriculum to a cohort of students, moving with their cohort through the school and enabling them to develop a close understanding of their studentsí learning strengths and weaknesses. Specialist teachers for, say, languages, music and physical education can be brought in by each team.


    (See Chapter 4 "Leadership for 21st century learning in Singapore's high-performing schools" of a report titled "Leadership for 21st century learning" published by OECD in 2013. )


    (The second paragraph of p.116. Here is the link: http://www.keepeek.com/Digital-Asset...406-en#page118)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2015
    • Posts: 44
    #2

    Re: a cohort of

    And there are two "say"s in this paragraph, may I refer them as "for example"?

  1. Skrej's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 2,398
    #3

    Re: a cohort of

    Yes, it means 'group'.

    Edit. Yes, 'say' means 'for example' in this context.

Similar Threads

  1. cohort
    By eaa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 31-Oct-2007, 16:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •