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    #1

    call (at) number

    Call 8928-7921.
    Call at 8928-7921.

    Which is correct?
    Last edited by sitifan; 25-Jul-2015 at 18:17.
    I need native speakers' help.

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    #2

    Re: call (at) number

    If it's a phone number, the first.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: call (at) number

    I think the second would be correct if someone was added between 'Call' and 'at'.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: call (at) number

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I think the second would be correct if someone was added between 'Call' and 'at'.
    You could also use call xxx on 8928-7921.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: call (at) number

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    Call 8928-7921.
    Call at 8928-7921.

    Which is correct?
    In BrE, we would use:

    Please call me on 8928-7921.
    You can call me on 9828-7834.
    Call me on 953-1956.

    We use "at" for the time. "Please call me on Thursday at 9.30am on 9384-29374."

    Recently, I've heard people using a phrase which I associate more with AmE - "You can reach me on 9838-9283" or "I can be reached on/at 8394-1937".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Skrej's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: call (at) number

    I've never heard 'call/reach me on xxx' in AmE, only 'call/reach at xxxx'.

    You might hear 'call me on my cell at xxxx'.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: call (at) number

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I've never heard 'call/reach me on xxx' in AmE, only 'call/reach at xxxx'.

    You might hear 'call me on my cell at xxxx'.
    With the first part, the BrE speakers are probablyl using a combination of the AmE "reach" with the BrE "on".

    For the second sentence, in BrE it would be "Call me on my mobile on XXXXX-XXXXXX". Many people don't bother to specify whether they're giving a landline or a mobile number in BrE. The 5-digit prefix indicates whether it's a mobile number or not. In addition, many people forward all the calls from their landline to their mobile, so you frequently end up speaking to someone on their mobile even if you didn't dial that number direct.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Skrej's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: call (at) number

    Hmm, American cell numbers and landlines look identical, so we tend to specify. You might pick up a clue as to it being a different area code or non-local prefix, but that could just mean they didn't buy their phone locally.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: call (at) number

    In the UK, landline numbers have a 4- or 5-digit prefix and contain, in total, either 11 or 12 digits (including the area code). Mobile numbers all have a 5-digit prefix, always contain 12 digits in total and their numbers always start with "07". There are no landline prefixes starting "07". It's reserved for mobile numbers. Landline numbers are region-specific. Mobile numbers are not.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: call (at) number

    Quote Originally Posted by Skrej View Post
    I've never heard 'call/reach me on xxx' in AmE, only 'call/reach at xxxx'.
    It's almost the exact opposite in the UK, though I have heard at used.

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