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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #1

    free of charge/for free/on the house

    I'm sorry for asking so many questions.

    Is the following translation O.K?
    (Tedmc kindly suggested that I use "free of charge" or "on the house" instead of "for free".)


    This is a loyalty/rewards card.
    Please bring the card with you the next time you visit us, and we will be happy to offer you one item from the food menu for free. (You can choose any item you would like from the menu.)

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    #2

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    My idea was that "for free" sounds rather informal.
    I am not a teacher.

  2. teechar's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    I'm sorry for asking so many questions.
    No need to be sorry at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Is the following translation O.K?
    (Tedmc kindly suggested that I use "free of charge" or "on the house" instead of "for free".)
    For me, "for free" or "free of charge" work in that sentence.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    This is a loyalty/rewards card.
    Please bring the card with you the next timeyou visit us, and we will be happy to offer you any one item that you like from the food menu for free.
    (You can choose any item you would like from the menu.)
    Note that you could simply say "next time" instead of "the next time you visit us."

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    Quote Originally Posted by teechar View Post
    For me, "for free" or "free of charge" work in that sentence.
    How about 'gratis'? Is it common?

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    I'm sorry for asking so many questions.
    Your answers to the learners are many more than your questions to the teachers.
    I am not a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    I'd shorten the whole thing to

    Please bring this loyalty card with you next time, and we will be happy to offer you any one item free from the food menu.

    I'm one of those who detest 'for free', considering the 'for' to be redundant. I have to endure it, though, as so many people seem to like it.

    Matthew, gratis is widely understood, but I wouldn't use it here.

  4. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    Thank you, Rover.

    1. After your meal, you can have a bowl of miso soup for free.
    2. Please ask your server for a free miso soup.

    These two sentences above are also my translations. Would you delete the "for" in #1?

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    '... you can have a free bowl of miso soup.'
    I am not a teacher.

  6. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Thank you, Rover.

    1. After your meal, you can have a bowl of miso soup for free bowl of miso soup.
    2. Please ask your server for a free miso soup.

    These two sentences above are also my translations. Would you delete the "for" in #1?
    Yes. Like Tedmc and Rover, I would not use "for free". Sentences often look and sound better without it, even if you have to reorganise the whole thing. I have altered your sentences to make them read more naturally.

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    #9

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post

    1. After your meal, you can have a bowl of miso soup for free.
    2. Please ask your server for a free miso soup.

    These two sentences above are also my translations. Would you delete the "for" in #1?
    Yes.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: free of charge/for free/on the house

    I have no problem with "for free".

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