Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 101
    #1

    Ask a teacher

    How to properly introduce/preface a comment in the “Ask a Teacher” forum?

    No hard and fast rules, I know.

    A piece of advice, perhaps? When to capitalise and what to cap? When to use a full stop? Certain ways of expressing it are obvious, while some could do with a bit of helpful elaboration of an expert for the benefit of all us learners.


    I have seen, e.g.,

    1. (not a teacher) — I use this one, scratching my head every time I want to add a comment (once in a blue moon, though).
    2. Not a teacher.
    3. Not a Teacher.
    4. (I am not a Teacher)
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #2

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Well, you're a learner so you're probably not going to be attempting to answer other learners' questions most of the time. However, in case you do, I recommend starting with "Not a teacher." (without the quotation marks but with the capital letter and the full stop).

    Otherwise, if you're asking a question or making a comment on your own thread, there is no need to preface it with anything. Give us a relevant thread title and go straight in to your question.

    The capitalisation rules apply to everyone and everything - capitalise the first word of every sentence, a sentence inside quotation marks, proper nouns and the word "I" at all times. End every sentence with a single, appropriate punctuation mark, whether it's a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,825
    #3

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    How to properly introduce/preface a comment in the “Ask a Teacher” forum?
    I would use 'How should I' or 'How can I' instead of 'How to' in a question.

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    I have seen, e.g...
    You might have also seen 'but I am not a teacher' at the end of a comment.
    I am not a teacher.

  3. tzfujimino's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,697
    #4

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    You might have also seen 'but I am not a teacher' at the end of a comment.
    Yes. I've seen it many times.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 101
    #5

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    I would use 'How should I' or 'How can I' instead of 'How to' in a question.


    You might have also seen 'but I am not a teacher' at the end of a comment.

    Thank you, Mat, for your kind input.

    Ad.1 To me, same difference.
    Ad.2 In my original post, there are no periods of ellipsis. If you prefer to use “e.g.”, and not “eg”, then there is one dot missing (or two if you like to end a sentence this way). But then again, I am not a teacher; merely a crotchety old man with learning difficulties.

    Also, I would be very reluctant to always start all quotations with a capital letter. This goes to the previous post.

    Regards,
    A.
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

  4. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,980
    #6

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    Ad.1 To me, same difference.

    The difference is that 'How to ..." works as a title, but is not the correct way to ask a question in standard English.

    p.s. What does 'Ad' signify?


    Also, I would be very reluctant to always start all quotations with a capital letter. This goes to the previous post
    emsr2d2 said you should capitalise the first letter of a sentence inside quotation marks.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 101
    #7

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post

    The difference is that 'How to ..." works as a title, but is not the correct way to ask a question in standard English.

    p.s. What does 'Ad' signify?


    [FONT=Calibri][SIZE=3][COLOR=#000000]

    emsr2d2 said you should capitalise the first letter of a sentence inside quotation marks.
    Ad is a Latin word, meaning preposition at (to), literally with regard to the point 1. Ad is a full word, hence the dot after Ad should have been omitted. Mea culpa.

    Yes, I meant the first letter of a sentence inside quotation marks. If the preceding part is closely related to the quotation, I would consider a lower case.
    Last edited by Auldlangsyne; 29-Jul-2015 at 17:58. Reason: 's' deleted from 'regards'
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

  5. Piscean's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Jul 2015
    • Posts: 9,980
    #8

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    Ad is a Latin word, meaning preposition at (to), literally with regards to the point 1
    If you are seriously concerned with using the right word, I suggest you eschew 'ad'. There are not many native speakers today who would understand what you meant.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Sep 2014
    • Posts: 101
    #9

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    If you are seriously concerned with using the right word, I suggest you eschew 'ad'. There are not many native speakers today who would understand what you meant.
    I will remember that, thank you. It hasn’t crossed my mind.

    I just grew up using it; first thing that comes to my mind now.
    The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter - 'tis the difference between the lightning-bug and the lightning.
    Mark Twain

  6. Matthew Wai's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Nov 2013
    • Posts: 7,825
    #10

    Re: Ask a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    The difference is that 'How to ..." works as a title
    emsr2d2 explained that 'When a chapter title or the title of any piece is "How to ...." it is basically a shortened form of "Now we are going to show you how to ..."'. ── quoted from https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/t...=1#post1123292

    Quote Originally Posted by Auldlangsyne View Post
    In my original post, there are no periods of ellipsis.
    I used ellipsis because your examples were left out of the quote.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Yes. I've seen it many times.
    Perhaps you won't see it again because Rover_KE has recently told the person to say it on the signature line.
    I am not a teacher.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Essay] agree or diagree : A student must like a teacher in order to earn from the teacher
    By ellenoctavia in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Jul-2014, 14:07
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-Jul-2014, 09:53
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Aug-2009, 13:38
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Jul-2006, 07:17
  5. ESL Teacher Kathy Mellor Named as Teacher of the Year
    By Red5 in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Apr-2004, 00:15

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •