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  1. faryan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question "won't" in any general sense?

    Dear teachers

    I wonder if you could help with this case. Is there any justification rather than "future tense" in using "won't" in the sentences below?

    The air conditioner won't turn on/off.
    The file won't open.

    Can we conclude that it has been used in a general sense to say that "it doesn't work properly anymore"?

    Thanks in advance

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "won't" in any general sense?

    They both convey a current state of affairs by making it sound as if the AC/file is incapable of carrying out the function mentioned. Of course, neither AC nor a file can actually "do" something in the same way a person "does" something.

    The AC won't switch on/off = It is impossible for me/us to switch the AC on or off
    The file won't open = I/We can't open the file.

    It's a common enough usage of "won't" or "will not" to mean that it is impossible to do something or to make something happen.

    "My son won't eat vegetables" - this is not the future tense. It's a statement of habitual action meaning "My son refuses to eat vegetables". We use "won't" to mean "refuse(s) to".

    I won't watch anything with Angelina Jolie in.
    My kids won't eat anything green.
    Mr Jones won't accept bad behaviour in his classroom.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: "won't" in any general sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "My son won't eat vegetables" - this is not the future tense. It's a statement of habitual action meaning "My son refuses to eat vegetables". We use "won't" to mean "refuse(s) to".
    Can we use "My son wouldn't eat vegetables" to refer to "My son refuses to eat vegetables"?

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    #4

    Re: "won't" in any general sense?

    That means he refused to eat vegetables (in the past/when he was a boy).

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