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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hebrew
      • Home Country:
      • Israel
      • Current Location:
      • Israel

    • Join Date: May 2015
    • Posts: 14
    #1

    using set/set up and "beginning of the street"

    Hi, I'd like some advice on the following sentence:

    We set up to meet at the beginning of my street.

    We are set to meet at the beginning of my street.

    1. I'm not sure I'm using set / set up correctly. What's the right way to say

    2. I'm not entirely sure about "beginning of my street" (after googling it looking for confirmation which I didn't get).
    What's the right way to say "a beginning of a street" (the opposite of "at the end of the street")?

    thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #2

    Re: using set/set up and "beginning of the street"

    We use "at the end of the street" where I live.

    We arranged to meet at the end of my street.
    We agreed to meet at the end of my street.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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