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    #1

    If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    Dear teachers and members:

    I° - Ronald Reagan: «138 members of my administration were investigated, indicted, or convicted of crime.»


    II° - Barrack Obama: «Not a single one of mine has [investigated, indicted, or convicted].»


    III° - «Their bags were picked up and taken to New York, but mine haven't [picked up and taken to New York].»


    It's obvous that BEEN has been omitted from quotes II° and III°. After discussing with some members about it, I have the following 4 questions [which are] at the end of this post.


    It's clearly known that BE is used to form the passive voice, and HAVE the perfect tenses. In short answers the main verb is not necessarily to be mentioned when a question has previously been asked; an auxiliary is not omitted in any sentence whether long of short.


    Have you been taken to New York?


    No, I haven't.


    QUESTIONS:


    (1) Is BE an auxiliary verb in the passive voice?


    (2) If is HAVE the auxiliary for the passive voice BEEN TAKEN, or HAVE and BE both are auxiliaries in the question above?


    (3) Knowing that an auxiliary cannot be omitted in any sentence, can BE, which I consider to be an auxiliary in the passive voice, be omitted when a short sentence is used in order to omit some parts of a previous one as in sentences II° and III° above?


    (4) Is BE is an auxiliary in the passive voice, why is it omitted in short answers?


    Thanks up front.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 10-Aug-2015 at 13:24.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    I° - Ronald Reagan: «138 members of my administration were investigated, indicted, or convicted of crime.»


    II° - Barrack Obama: «Not a single one of mine has [investigated, indicted, or convicted].»


    III° - «Their bags were picked up and taken to New York, but mine haven't [picked up and taken to New York].»


    Did you write these?

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    #3

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    In what language is ° a symbol for 'number'?

    In English it means 'degrees'.

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    #4

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    In any language Rover_KE; I'm used to doing this way.

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    #5

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    In any event, where did you find these sentences?

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    #6

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    No, I didn't. The I° and II° were taken them from a picture in an English grammar forum, the III° from one the members comment; the ones inside the brackets were done by me.

    As for me Bhaisahab, BEEN cannot be omitted in each of them. but basically I would like to know the followings:

    Is HAVE the auxiliary for the passive voice BEEN TAKEN, or HAVE and BE both are auxiliaries in the question below?

    Have you been taken to New York?

    No, I haven't.

    Is BE is an auxiliary in the passive voice, why is it omitted in short answers when it's along with the auxiliary HAVE?

    Have you been taken to New York?

    No, I haven't [been].




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    #7

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    SoothingDave, if I knew how to upload or paste pictures, I would let you know where I found them.

    Please, I would like to know if BE is an auxiliary verb in the passive voice, and if in the sentence below, HAVE is an auxiliary for BEEN TAKEN, or if BE and HAVE both are auxiliaries in this sentence below.

    Have you been taken to New York?

    No, I haven't.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    In what language is ° a symbol for 'number'?

    In English it means 'degrees'.
    In the Latin languages, it changes numbers to the ordinal from the cardinal (primo, secundo, tertio...) so it's actually a superscript O.

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    #9

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    When used in passive and or progressive/continuous constructions, BE is always an auxiliary.
    When used in perfect constructions, HAVE is always an auxiliary,

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    #10

    Re: If it is an auxiliary, why is it omited?

    Thank you all, I would also like to see your comments regarding the following:


    I have a red car (''red'' is an adjective which modifies the noun ''car'')


    I have a wonderful red car (''wonderful'' is an adjective which modifies the noun phrase ''red car'')


    You were taken to New York (passive voice in the simple past tense)


    You have been taken to New York (passive voice in the present perfect tense)


    As far as I can understand, BE is an auxiliary verb for the main verb TAKE in ''you were taken to New York''; whereas HAVE is an auxiliary for the passive voice structure ''were taken''. Am I right?

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