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    #1

    comparative

    Hello, Teacher!

    Which way of making comparative is correct, or preferable if both ways are possible, for these adjectives:
    friendly, lonely, common, quiet, shy, simple, crazy?

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    #2

    Re: comparative

    Click here for a useful tutorial, then make your own effort for us to check.

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    #3

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Click here for a useful tutorial, then make your own effort for us to check.
    Hello Rover_KE,

    I read that tutorial, but it was not very helpful.
    They used the adjective "clever" as an example of adjectives which make their comparative and superlative forms by adding -er and -est. However, I saw in other grammar books that it can also take more and most to form its comparative and superlative.

    I know the basic rules, but a number of disyllabic words are a bit complicated for me:/, and grammar books do not always help since they offer different rules(for instance, obscure is in one grammar treated as an adjective which takes more and most and in another as an adjective which takes inflected forms). Because of that, I wanted native speakers' opinion.

    And since you wanted my effort, these are the forms which I usually use:
    friendlier or more friendly- I use both equally, more lonely, more common, more quiet, shyer, simpler, crazier, narrower, more obscure, more polite, more clever.
    For all these adjectives I have read somewhere that both possibilities are acceptable and I would like to know if native speakers agree with that.

  1. Piscean's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: comparative

    Quote Originally Posted by Meja View Post
    For all these adjectives I have read somewhere that both possibilities are acceptable and I would like to know if native speakers agree with that.
    I do.

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    #5

    Re: comparative

    The only one in your list I would have a problem with if you added the comparative suffix -er, is "common". Despite the adjective having only two syllables, "commoner" is unnatural. I would expect "more common".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: comparative

    You took the words right out of my computer.

    I would include "obscure".

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    #7

    Re: comparative

    You mean that you would include "obscure" along with "common" not making a comparative form by adding the suffix -er?
    Thanks for the reply :)

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    #8

    Re: comparative

    Yes. I would use "more obscure".

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    #9

    Re: comparative

    What about "funny,"
    are both ways possible here, too?

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: comparative

    Yes, but I prefer "funnier". You will find no universal rules in this area. Individuals have preferences.

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