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      • Native Language:
      • Persian
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      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Aug 2015
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    #1

    He completed his time.

    I have other questions, in which the reddend words are specially important:

    What is the exact meaning of "...and therein (ship) embarked Ruy Gonsalves de Siqueira, provided with the captaincy of that fortress, D. Juliao de Noronha, who was there, having completed his time"? Does it mean "He died"?

    The second question:
    "...He killed many of their men, and caused such havoc, that the Hollanders went hauling on warps until they lay across the bow of our ship..."

    And the third one:
    "The masses of ice and snow so great that broke up in the lower part of that strait, that, driving in the teeth of the ship"

    These sentences are from the book "The Travels of Pedro Teixeira" written nearly 400 years ago in Portuguese, and translated into english more than 100 years ago. Its language is somehow relatively ambiguous.
    Thanks very very much
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 13-Aug-2015 at 09:41.

  1. Eckaslike's Avatar
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      • England
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      • Wales

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    #2

    Re: He completed his time.

    "completed his time":
    No, it doesn't mean that he died. Looking at the original, this whole sentence is very convoluted and seems to almost be a literal translation of the Portuguese. It means that he "served his time", meaning that he had served enough in the past to be given some position of responsibility.

    "Hollanders went hauling on warps":
    "Warps" are ropes which are attached to stationary objects. Here, the Dutch are pulling on the warps, or ropes, with grappling hooks on the end, which they have thrown or fired onto the enemy ship, which they then use to pull their ship alongside the other.

    "driving in the teeth of":
    This phrase seems to be a literal translation again. I've never heard of the idiom "the teeth of the ship" in English. You do get a sense of meaning though, in that the pressure of the ice floes are in danger of crushing the ship.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Aug 2015
    • Posts: 106
    #3

    Re: He completed his time.

    Thanks heartily, thanks very much, those sentence were formidable for me, however I have read the entire of that book, but its old style is sometimes extremely chalenging.
    I am a native Persian, learnt English in Iran, and not familiar with this old style. your answer is an unforgettable help for me.
    Accept my endless thanks again, please!

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