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    #1

    don't go out leaving the oven on

    Can one say
    a. Don't go out leaving the oven on.
    b. Don't go out and leave the oven on.

    ?
    These sentences are supposed to mean: If you go out, turn off the oven.

    Can one say
    c. Don't have an affair breaking your husband's heart.
    d. Don't have an affair and break your husband's heart.

    ?
    These two are supposed to mean: Don't have an affair. If you do, you will break your husband's heart.

    Many thanks.

  1. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: don't go out leaving the oven on

    I think you have already got the answers below, but I am not a teacher.
    http://forum.wordreference.com/threa...-door.3048275/

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    #3

    Re: don't go out leaving the oven on

    Well spotted, Matthew.

    azz, in future, please have the courtesy tell us that you have already received answers in another forum and that you are not satisfied with them.

    Why did you feel the need to ask us the same questions?

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    #4

    Re: don't go out leaving the oven on

    I would also like to know why the a. sentence is not correct.
    Gerund indicates that the actions happen at the same time, while the second sentence can be ambiguous.

    Concerning the third sentence, I get the impression that "an affair" is the subject of the verb "to break" ("...an affair (which is) breaking..."- She can have other types of affairs but not the ones which might break her husband's heart) and the subject of the verb "to break" in the last sentence is "you", which makes them different, but I am not a native speaker and maybe I do not understand them well.

    He was not given any grammar explanations in another forum and maybe he hoped to get some here instead of being criticized. :)

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: don't go out leaving the oven on

    I'd accept a.

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