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    #1

    boing

    I am not fully understand theunderlined sentence extracted from the New York Times as written.

    Incense drifting through ancient. Saffron-robed monks, limbs a blur ofmovement, making quick work of imagined enemies. The boing of a giant bronzebell calling the faithful to prayer.


    My questions are:
    1. What is "boing"? Is it a kind of sound?
    2. It seems to be no verb in the underlined sentence. Is it correct?
    3. Does "the faithful" mean "people who are faithful"?


  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: boing

    I think this is the full article:
    http://cn.nytimes.com/china/20150806/c06shaolin/en-us/

    As for "boing", I found this:
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us..._english/boing

    So, you're right. It's the sound/noise of the bell.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 18-Aug-2015 at 12:14.

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: boing

    Quote Originally Posted by contiluo View Post
    2. It seems to be no verb in the underlined sentence. Is it correct?
    I can't see a finite verb in the underlined text, so I consider it a phrase instead of a sentence, but I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: boing

    Thank you for the link to the full article, tzfujimino. It makes things much clearer. Contiluo, please note that this would have been helpful in your original post.

    There is no main verb in the first part of the quotation, either, and 'cedars' is missing after 'ancient'.

    The following paragraph explains everything: the phrases are setting the scene at the fabled Shaolin Temple.

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: boing

    Quote Originally Posted by contiluo View Post
    I am not fully understand...
    It seems to be no verb in the underlined sentence.
    I would use 'do' and 'there' instead of 'am' and 'It' respectively, but I am not a teacher.

  4. Eckaslike's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: boing

    Am I the only one that finds the use of the word "boing" odd, in the context of a giant bronze bell?

    I feel that "boing" is the sound a metal spring makes, such as on a jack-in-the-box, or when the spring breaks out of something like a matress, or mechanical toy. The definition posted by tzfujimino seems to confirm that. "Boing" is usually a bouncy sound, and I don't remember many bells, especially large one's that sounded bouncy. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7vfbyFl5kc


    For me the natural sound of a large temple bell is represented by one of the standard noise words, namely, "bong".
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us...n_english/bong

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VI2IRq17rs

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    #7

    Re: boing

    I would use "bong" or "dong" for the sound of a large bell. I associate "boing" with springs and kangaroos!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Piscean's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: boing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I associate "boing" with springs and kangaroos!
    ... and Zebedee.

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: boing

    Quote Originally Posted by Piscean View Post
    ... and Zebedee.
    Well, for Zebedee, I always say "Buh-doing" (followed by "Time for bed, said Zebedee").

    In case you all think we're going mad ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZTBDnj0Cgc

    I have to admit that it just sounds like "boing" on the video.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  8. Piscean's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: boing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Well, for Zebedee, I always say "Buh-doing" .
    You are probably the sort of philistine who likes Disney's Pooh.

    'Buh-doing' indeed! Is nothing sacred?

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