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    #1

    Bound for the abattoir

    This is a sentence from my short story. I am not sure if I have written it correctly, and I am wondering if someone would look at it and correct my mistakes.

    At the crossing, buses and tanks had been waiting for them, together with the soldiers who stared at them with the mixture of scorn and interest, as if they were cattle bound for the abattoir.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    The only thing I would change would be to say "with a mixture", not "the mixture".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    I first heard the word "abattoir" in a Monty Python sketch. In AmE, we simply say "slaughterhouse."

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    And I'd never heard the word "slaughterhouse" until I watched Footloose and they talked about the book Slaughterhouse 5. They're still abattoirs in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    It's always interesting which Frenchy words and pronunciations you use versus American use. For example, we will say "filet mignon" like a Frenchman (more or less) but I have heard Brits talk of "filet" steaks, where "filet" sounds like "fill it."

    But then you use a word like "abattoir" which I assume has to be French.

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    #6

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    We Brits are talking about 'fillet' steaks, which do not pretend to be French.

    fil•let/fɪˈleɪ/
    n.

    1. a boneless cut or slice of meat or fish, such as the beef tenderloin:
    (Random House Learners' Dictionary of American English)

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    #7

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fillet_(cut)

    Yep. Fill it or fill A. Still is derived from the French. There's nothing inherently wrong with that. I just find it interesting how American and British use differs.

    A fillet (or filet) (UK /ˈfɪlɪt/, US /fɨˈleɪ/; from the French word filet /filɛ/) is a cut or slice of boneless meat or fish.






  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    There is little consistency in how BrE speakers pronounce foreign words.

    One of my bugbears is people who pronounce "nougat" as "nugget". Firstly, it's a French word and should be pronounced "noo-gah" and "nugget" is a completely different word with a completely different meaning.

    Then there's "bruschetta", a classic Italian starter. For some reason, the majority of BrE speakers seem to think it's "broo-shetter" as if the "sch" is from the German. However, it's an Italian word and should be "broo-sketter".

    There are probably few BrE speakers who actually pronounce "abattoir" in the way it's pronounced in French but it's not far off, just an Anglicised version.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    One of my bugbears is people who pronounce "nougat" as "nugget". Firstly, it's a French word and should be pronounced "noo-gah" and "nugget" is a completely different word with a completely different meaning. .
    It was, in my youth, a word that had been taken into English and pronounced in the English way, 'nugget'. People like you introduced the French pronunciation in the early 1960s, and that version happens to have won out.

    Are you seriously advocating that words that came to us from the French should be pronounced as the French pronounce them today? If so, and I assume that what's good for the French is good for all other words that modern English took from other languages, then we are going to have to look at the pronunciations of 90+% of the words listed in our dictionaries and change to the 'correct' pronunciations. Let's start with 'France' and 'Paris'. I'll leave the next half million to you.

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    #10

    Re: Bound for the abattoir

    [Not a teacher]

    For those non-English natives (I am one of them) interested in its pronunciation: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/pron...glish/abattoir
    José Manuel Rosón Bravo

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