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    #1

    Can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner?

    As the title speaks for itself, can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner? Can you cite a few examples for me?



  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner?

    Sure. "This is the kitten that I promised you." 'Kitten' is accompanied by 'this', 'the' and 'that'.
    Is that what you mean? I don't think accompany is a grammatical term.

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    #3

    Re: Can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Sure. "This is the kitten that I promised you." 'Kitten' is accompanied by 'this', 'the' and 'that'.
    Is that what you mean? I don't think accompany is a grammatical term.
    Not exactly. I need a sentence that no other words interrupt the head noun such as:

    These are the three cats that I talked you about. Is this sentence grammatical?

    And, why do you believe that "accompany" is not grammatical?

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    #4

    Re: Can a single countable noun accompany more than one determiner?

    Yes the sentence in your second line above is grammatical.

    "Accompany" is not a grammatical term in the sense that, say 'modify' or 'qualify' are. "Adverbs modify verbs", "Adjectives qualify nouns". 'Accompany' doesn't mean anything to me in grammar, though I can see now that your question is whether more than one determiner can directly precede a noun. Yes, your sentence demonstrates that.

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