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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    fire the ball

    Being the goalkeeper can sometimes be a stressful experience. When the other team is awarded a penalty kick and your opponent's best scorer is about to fire the ball in your direction from a mere 11 meters away, your first instinct may be to panic. Worse still, the rules state that you are prohibited from moving until the kicker's foot makes contact with the ball...

    1. Is "fire the ball" a common expression or a metaphor?
    2. What does "worse still" mean? "much worse"?

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: fire the ball

    1. I am not a big soccer fan, but I believe that expression is common.
    2. "Worse still" means "even worse".

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    #3

    Re: fire the ball

    not a teacher

    As Mike says, "fire the ball" is common, but it doesn't only occur in soccer/football. It's used in many sports to mean throw/pitch/bowl/kick/hit a ball with speed.
    The first page here has examples from cricket, American football, baseball and lacrosse.
    http://fraze.it/n_search.jsp?hardm=1...=fire+the+ball

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: fire the ball

    Do you mean "Worse still = "much/still/even/far/a lot worse" as an emphasizing expression?

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    #5

    Re: fire the ball

    not a teacher

    Sometimes "still" is used with comparatives for emphasis.

    Two years ago our firm lost $20,000.
    Last year was worse, we lost $100,000.
    This year has been worse still. We've lost $105,000.

    It doesn't necessarily mean "far worse" or "a lot worse". As in the above example, the increase in the loss may be small, but it is indeed a greater loss.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: fire the ball

    I agree with JMurray. The magnitude is not mentioned.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: fire the ball

    Can you say like 2? I'd like to know the difference between "worse still" and "still worse".

    Two years ago our firm lost $20,000.
    Last year was worse, we lost $100,000.
    1. This year has been worse still. We've lost $105,000.
    2.
    This year has been still worse. We've lost $200,000.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: fire the ball

    No difference.

  7. lotus888's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: fire the ball

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Being the goalkeeper can sometimes be a stressful experience. When the other team is awarded a penalty kick and your opponent's best scorer is about to fire the ball in your direction from a mere 11 meters away, your first instinct may be to panic. Worse still, the rules state that you are prohibited from moving until the kicker's foot makes contact with the ball...

    1. Is "fire the ball" a common expression or a metaphor?
    2. What does "worse still" mean? "much worse"?
    In this case, "firing a ball" is like "firing a cannon".


    --lotus

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